Random Short Take #89

Welcome to Random Short Take #89. I’ve been somewhat preoccupied with the day job and acquisitions. And the start of the NBA season. But Summer is almost here in the Antipodes. Let’s get random.

  • Jon Waite put out this article on how to deploy an automated Cassandra metrics cluster for VCD.
  • Chris Wahl wrote a great article on his thoughts on platform engineering as product design at scale. I’ve always found Chris to be a switched on chap, and his recent articles diving deeper into this topic have done nothing to change my mind.
  • Curtis and I have spoken about this previously, and he talks some more about the truth behind SaaS data recovery over at Gestalt IT. The only criticism I have for Curtis is that he’s just as much Mr Recovery as he is Mr Backup and he should have trademarked that too.
  • Would it be a Random Short Take without something from Chin-Fah? Probably not one worth reading. In this article he’s renovated his lab and documented the process of attaching TrueNAS iSCSI volumes to his Proxmox environment. I’m fortunate enough to not have had to do Linux iSCSI in some time, but it looks mildly easier than it used to be.
  • Press releases? Here’s one for you: Zerto research report finds companies lack a comprehensive ransomware strategy. Unlike the threat of World War 3 via nuclear strike in the eighties, ransomware is not a case of if, but when.
  • Hungry for more press releases? Datadobi is accelerating its channel momentum with StorageMAP.
  • In other PR news, Nyriad has unveiled its storage-as-a-service offering. I had a chance to speak to them recently, and they are doing some very cool stuff – worth checking out.
  • I hate all kinds of gambling, and I really hate sports gambling, and ads about it. And it drives me nuts when I see sports gambling ads in apps like NBA League Pass. So this news over at El Reg about the SBS offering consumers the chance to opt out of those kinds of ads is fantastic news. It doesn’t fix the problem, but it’s a step in the right direction.

Random Short Take #82

Happy New Year (to those who celebrate). Let’s get random.

Random Short Take #72

This one is a little behind thanks to some work travel, but whatever. Let’s get random.

Using A Pure Storage FlashBlade As A Veeam Repository

I’ve been doing some testing in the lab recently. The focus of this testing has been primarily on Pure Storage’s ObjectEngine and its associated infrastructure. As part of that, I’ve been doing various things with Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 4, including setting up a FlashBlade NFS repository. I’ve documented the process in a document here. One thing that I thought worthy of noting separately was the firewall requirements. For my Linux Mount Server, I used a CentOS 7 VM, configured with 8 vCPUs and 16GB of RAM. I know, I normally use Debian, but for some reason (that I didn’t have time to investigate) it kept dying every time I kicked off a backup job.

In any case, I set everything up as per Pure’s instructions, but kept getting timeout errors on the job. The error I got was “5/17/2019 10:03:47 AM :: Processing HOST-01 Error: A connection attempt failed because the connected party did not properly respond after a period of time, or established connection failed because connected host has failed to respond NFSMOUNTHOST:2500“. It felt like it was probably a firewall issue of some sort. I tried to make an exception on the Windows VM hosting the Veeam Backup server, but that didn’t help. The problem was with the Linux VM’s firewall. I used the instructions I found here to add in some custom rules. According to the Veeam documentation, Backup Repository access uses TCP ports 2500 – 5000. Your SecOps people will no doubt have a conniption, but here’s how to open those ports on CentOS.

Firstly, is the firewall running?

[danf@nfsmounthost ~]$ sudo firewall-cmd --state
[sudo] password for danf:
running

Yes it is. So let’s stop it to see if this line of troubleshooting is worth pursuing.

[danf@nfsmounthost ~]$ sudo systemctl stop firewalld

The backup job worked after that. Okay, so let’s start it up again and open up some ports to test.

[danf@nfsmounthost ~]$ sudo systemctl start firewalld
[danf@nfsmounthost ~]$ sudo firewall-cmd --add-port=2500-5000/tcp
success

That worked, so I wanted to make it a more permanent arrangement.

[danf@nfsmounthost ~]$ sudo firewall-cmd --permanent --add-port=2500-5000/tcp
success
[danf@nfsmounthost ~]$ sudo firewall-cmd --permanent --list-ports
2500-5000/tcp

Remember, it’s never the storage. It’s always the firewall. Also, keep in my mind this article is about the how. I’m not offering my opinion about whether it’s really a good idea to configure your host-based firewalls with more holes than Swiss cheese. Or whatever things have lots of holes in them.