Random Short Take #37

Welcome to Random Short Take #37. Not a huge amount of players have worn 37 in the NBA, but Metta World Peace did a few times. When he wasn’t wearing 15, and other odd numbers. But I digress. Let’s get random.

  • Pavilion Data recently added S3 capability to its platform. It’s based on a variant of MinIO, and adds an interesting dimension to what Pavilion Data has traditionally offered. Mellor provided some good coverage here.
  • Speaking of object storage, Dell EMC recently announced ECS 3.5. You can read more on that here. The architectural white paper has been updated to reflect the new version as well.
  • Speaking of Dell EMC, Preston posted a handy article on Data Domain Retention Lock and NetWorker. Have you pre-ordered Preston’s book yet? I’ll keep asking until you do.
  • Online events are all the rage at the moment, and two noteworthy events are coming up shortly: Pure//Accelerate and VeeamON 2020. Speaking of online events, we’re running a virtual BNEVMUG next week. Details on that here. ZertoCON Virtual is also a thing.
  • Speaking of Pure Storage, this article from Cody Hosterman on NVMe and vSphere 7 is lengthy, but definitely worth the read.
  • I can’t recall whether I mentioned that this white paper  covering VCD on VCF 3.9 is available now, and I can’t be bothered checking. So here it is.
  • I’m not just a fan of Backblaze because of its cool consumer backup solution and object storage platform, I’m also a big fan because of its blog. Articles like this one are a great example of companies doing corporate culture right (at least from what I can see).
  • I have the impression that Datadobi has been doing some cool stuff recently, and this story certainly seems to back it up.

Random Short Take #35

Welcome to Random Short Take #35. Some really good players have worn 35 in the NBA, including The Big Dog Antoine Carr, and Reggie Lewis. This one, though, goes out to one of my favourite players from the modern era, Kevin Durant. If it feels like it’s only been a week since the last post, that’s because it has. I bet you wish that I was producing some content that’s more useful than a bunch of links. So do I.

  • I don’t often get excited about funding rounds, but I have a friend who works there, so here’s an article covering the latest round (C) of funding for VAST Data.
  • Datadobi continue to share good news in these challenging times, and has published a success story based on some work it’s done with Payspan.
  • Speaking of challenging times, the nice folks a Retrospect are offering a free 90-day license subscription for Retrospect Backup. You don’t need a credit card to sign up, and “[a]ll backups can be restored, even if the subscription is cancelled”.
  • I loved this post from Russ discussing a recent article on Facebook and learning from network failures at scale. I’m in love with the idea that you can’t automate your way out of misconfiguration. We’ve been talking a lot about this in my day job lately. Automation can be a really exciting concept, but it’s not magic. And as scale increase, so too does the time it takes to troubleshoot issues. It all seems like a straightforward concept, but you’d be surprised how many people are surprised by these ideas.
  • Software continues to dominate the headlines, but hardware still has a role to play in the world. Alastair talks more about that idea here.
  • Paul Stringfellow recently jumped on the Storage Unpacked podcast to talk storage myths versus reality. Worth listening to.
  • It’s not all good news though. Sometimes people make mistakes, and pull out the wrong cables. This is a story I’ll be sharing with my team about resiliency.
  • SMR drives and consumer NAS devices aren’t necessarily the best combo. So this isn’t the best news either. I’m patiently waiting for consumer Flash drive prices to come down. It’s going to take a while though.

 

Datadobi Announces DobiMigrate 5.8 – Introduces Chain of Custody

Datadobi recently announced version 5.8 of its DobiMigrate software and introduced a “Chain of Custody” feature. I had the opportunity to speak to Carl D’Halluin and Michael Jack about the announcement and thought I’d share some thoughts on it here.

 

Don’t They Do File Migration?

If you’re unfamiliar with Datadobi, it’s a company that specialises in NAS migration software. It tends to get used a lot by the major NAS vendors as rock solid method of moving data of a competitor’s box and onto theirs. Datadobi has been around for quite a while, and a lot of the founders have heritage with EMC Centera.

Chain of Custody?

So what exactly does the Chain of Custody feature offer?

  • Tracking files and objects throughout an entire migration
  • Full photo-finish of source and destination system at cutover time
  • Forensic input which can serve as future evidence of tampering
  • Available for all migrations.
    • No performance hit.
    • No enlarged maintenance window.

[image courtesy of Datadobi]

Why Is This Important?

Organisations are subject to a variety of legislative requirements the word over to ensure that the data presented as evidence in courts of law hasn’t been tampered with. Some of them spend an inordinate amount of money ensuring that the document management systems (and the hardware those systems reside on) offer all kinds of compliance and governance features that ensure that you can reliably get up in front of a judge and say that nothing has been messed with. Or you can reliably say that it has been messed with. Either way though, it’s reliable. Unfortunately, nothing lasts forever (not even those Centera cubes we put in years ago).

So what do you do when you have to migrate your data from one platform to another? If you’ve just used rsync or robocopy to get the data from one share to another, how can you reliably prove that you’ve done so, without corrupting or otherwise tampering with the data? Logs are just files, after all, so what’s to stop someone “losing” some data. along the way?

It turns out that a lot of folks in the legal profession have been aware that this was a problem for a while, but they’ve looked the other way. I am no lawyer, but as it was explained to me, if you introduce some doubt into the reliability of the migration process, it’s easy enough for the other side to counter that your stuff may not have been so reliable either, and the whole thing becomes something of a shambles. Of course, there’s likely a more coherent way to explain this, but this is tech blog and I’m being lazy.

 

Thoughts

I’ve done all kinds of data migrations over the years. I think I’ve been fortunate that I’ve never specifically had to deal with a system that was being relied on seriously for legislative reasons, because I’m sure that some of those migrations were done more by the seat of my pants than anything else. Usually the last thing on the organisation’s mind (?) was whether the migration activity was compliant or not. Instead, the focus of the project manager was normally to get the data from the old box to the new box as quickly as possible and with as little drama / downtime as possible.

If you’re working on this stuff in a large financial institution though, you’ll likely have a different focus. And I’m sure the last thing your corporate counsel want to hear is that you’ve been playing a little fast and loose with data over the years. I anticipate this announcement will be greeted with some happiness by people who’ve been saddled with these kinds of daunting tasks in the past. As we move to a more and more digital world, we need to carry some of the concepts from the physical world across. It strikes me that Datadobi has every reason to be excited about this announcement. You can read the press release here.