Random Short Take #43

Welcome to Random Short Take #43. A few players have worn 43 in the NBA, including Frank Brickowski, but my favourite from this list is Red Kerr (more for his commentary chops than his game, I think).  Let’s get random.

  • Mike Wilson has published Part 2 of his VMware VCP 2020 Study Guide and it’s a ripper. Check it out here. I try to duck and weave when it comes to certification exams nowadays, but these kind of resources are invaluable.
  • It’s been a while since I had stick time with Data Domain OS, but Preston’s article on password hardening was very useful.
  • Mr Foskett bought a cloud, of sorts. Read more about that here. Anyone who knows Stephen knows that he’s all about what’s talking about what’s happening in the industry, but I do enjoy reading about these home projects as well.
  • Speaking of clouds, Rancher was named “A Leader” in multi-cloud container development platforms by an independent research firm. You can read the press release here.
  • Datadobi had a good story to share about what it did with UMass Memorial Health Care. You can read the story here.
  • Steve O has done way too much work understanding how to change the default theme in Veeam Enterprise Manager 10 and documenting the process so you don’t need to work it out. Read about the process here.
  • Speaking of data protection, Zerto has noticed Azure adoption increasing at quite a pace, amongst other things.
  • This was a great article on open source storage from Chin-Fah.

Datadobi Announces DobiProtect

Datadobi recently announced DobiProtect. I had the opportunity to speak with Michael Jack and Carl D’Halluin about the announcement, and thought I’d share some thoughts here.

 

The Problem

Disaster Recovery

Modern disaster recovery solutions tend more towards business continuity than DR. The challenge with data replication solutions is that it’s a trivial thing to replicate corruption from your primary storage to your DR storage. Backup systems are vulnerable too, and most instances you need to make some extra effort to ensure you’ve got a replicated catalogue, and that your backup data is not isolated. Invariably, you’ll be looking to restore to like hardware in order to reduce the recovery time. Tape is still a pain to deal with, and invariably you’re also at the mercy of people and processes going wrong.

What Do Customers Need?

To get what you need out of a robust DR system, there are a few criteria that need to be met, including:

  • An easy way to select business-critical data;
  • A simple way to make a golden copy in native format;
  • A bunker site in a DC or cloud;
  • A manual air-gap procedure;
  • A way to restore to anything; and
  • A way to failover if required.

 

Enter DobiProtect

What Does It Do?

The idea is that you have two sites with a manual air-gap between them, usually controlled by a firewall of some type. The first site is where you run your production workload, and there’ll likely be a subset of data that is really quirte important to your business. You can use DobiProtect to get that data from your production site to DR (it might even be in a bunker!). In order to get the data from Production to DR, DobiProtect scans the data before it’s pulled across to DR. Note that the data is pulled, not pushed. This is important as it means that there’s no obvious trace of the bunker’s existence in production.

[image courtesy of Datadobi]

If things go bang, you can recover to any NAS or Object.

  • Browse golden copy
  • Select by directory structure, folder, or object patterns
  • Mounts and shares
  • Specific versions

Bonus Use Case

One of the more popular use cases that Datadobi spoke to me about was heterogeneous edge-to-core protection. Data on the edge is usually more vulnerable, and not every organisation has the funding to put robust protection mechanisms in place at every edge site to protect critical data. With the advent of COVID-19, many organisations have been pushing more data to the edge in order for remote workers to have better access to data. The challenge then becomes keeping that data protected in a reliable fashion. DobiProtect can be used to pull data from the core once data has been pulled back from the edge. Because it’s a software only product, your edge storage can be anything that supports object, SMB, or NFS, and the core could be anything else. This provides a lot of flexibility in terms of the expense traditionally associated with DR at edge sites.

[image courtesy of Datadobi]

 

Thoughts and Further Reading

The idea of an air-gapped site in a bunker somewhere is the sort of thing you might associate with a James Bond story. In Australia these aren’t exactly a common thing (bunkers, not James Bond stories), but Europe and the US is riddled with them. As Jack pointed out in our call, “[t]he first rule of bunker club – you don’t talk about the bunker”. Datadobi couldn’t give me a list of customers using this type of solution because all of the customers didn’t want people to know that they were doing things this way. It seems a bit like security via obscurity, but there’s no point painting a big target on your back or giving clues out for would-be crackers to get into your environment and wreak havoc.

The idea that your RPO is a day, rather than minutes, is also confronting for some folks. But the idea of this solution is that you’ll use it for your absolutely mission critical can’t live without it data, not necessarily your virtual machines that you may be able to recover normally if you’re attacked or the magic black smoke escapes from one of your hosts. If you’ve gone to the trouble of looking into acquiring some rack space in a bunker, limited the people in the know to a handful, and can be bothered messing about with a manual air-gap process, the data you’re looking to protect is clearly pretty important.

Datadobi has a rich heritage in data migration for both file and object storage systems. It makes sense that eventually customer demand would drive them down this route to deliver a migration tool that ostensibly runs all the time as sort of data protection tool. This isn’t designed to protect everything in your environment, but for the stuff that will ruin your business if it goes away, it’s very likely worth the effort and expense. There are some folks out there actively looking for ways to put you over a barrel, so it’s important to think about what it’s worth to your organisation to avoid that if possible.

Random Short Take #42

Welcome to Random Short Take #42. A few players have worn 42 in the NBA, including Vin Baker, but my favourite from this list is Walt Williams.  A big man with a jumpshot and a great tube sock game. Let’s get random.

  • Datadobi has formed a partnership with Melillo Consulting to do more in the healthcare data management space. You can read the release here.
  • It’s that time of the year when Backblaze releases its quarterly hard drive statistics. It makes for some really interesting reading, and I’m a big fan of organisations that are willing to be as transparent as Backblaze is with the experience it’s having in the field. It has over 142000 drives in the field, across a variety of vendors, and the insights it delivers with this report are invaluable. In my opinion this is nothing but a good thing for customers and the industry in general. You can read more about the report here.
  • Was Airplay the reason you littered your house with Airport Express boxes? Same here. Have you been thinking it might be nice to replace the Airport Express with a Raspberry Pi since you’ve moved on to a different wireless access point technology? Same here. This article might just be the thing you’ve been looking for. I’m keen to try this out.
  • I’ve been trying to optimise my weblog, and turned on Cloudflare via my hosting provider. The website ran fine, but I had issues accessing the WordPress admin page after a while. This article got me sorted out.
  • I’ve been a bit loose with the security of my home infrastructure from time to time, but even I don’t use WPS. Check out this article if you’re thinking it might somehow be a good idea.
  • This article on caching versus tiering from Chris Evans made for some interesting reading.
  • This was a thorough review of the QNAP QSW-308-1C Unmanaged Switch, an 11 (!) port unmanaged switch boasting 3 10Gbps ports and 8 1Gbps ports. It’s an intriguing prospect, particularly given the price.
  • DH2i has announced it’s extending free access to DxOdyssey Work From Home (WFH) Software until December 31st. Read more about that here.

 

Random Short Take #39

Welcome to Random Short Take #39. Not a huge amount of players have worn 39 in the NBA, and I’m not going to pretend I’m any real fan of The Dwightmare. But things are tough all around, so let’s remain optimistic and push through to number 40. Anyway let’s get random.

  • VeeamON 2020 was online this week, and Anthony Spiteri has done a great job of summarising the major technical session announcements here.
  • I’ve known Howard Marks for a while now, and always relish the opportunity to speak with him when I can. This post is pretty hilarious, and I’m looking forward to reading the followup posts.
  • This is a great article from Alastair Cooke on COVID-19 and what En-Zed has done effectively to stop the spread. It was interesting to hear his thoughts on returning to the US, and I do agree that it’s going to be some time until I make the trip across the Pacific again.
  • Sometimes people get crazy ideas about how they might repurpose some old bits of technology. It’s even better when they write about their experiences in doing so. This article on automating an iPod Hi-Fi’s volume control over at Six Colors was fantastic.
  • Chris M. Evans put out a typically thought-provoking piece on data migration challenges recently that I think is worth checking out. I’ve been talking a lot to customers that are facing these challenges on a daily basis, and it’s interesting to see how, regardless of the industry vertical they operate in, it’s sometimes just a matter of the depth varying, so to speak.
  • I frequently bump into Ray Lucchesi at conferences, and he knows a fair bit about what does and doesn’t work. This article on his experiences recently with a number of virtual and online conferences is the epitome of constructive criticism.
  • Speaking of online conferences, the Australian VMUG UserCon will be virtual this year and will be held on the 30th July. You can find out more and register here.
  • Finally, if you’ve spent any time with me socially, you’ll know I’m a basketball nut. And invariably I’ll tell you that Deftones is may favouritest band ever. So it was great to come across this article about White Pony on one of my favourite sports (and popular culture) websites. If you’re a fan of Deftones, this is one to check out.

 

Datadobi Announces S3 Migration Capability

Datadobi recently announced S3 migration capabilities as part of DobiMigrate 5.9. I had the opportunity to speak to Carl D’Halluin and Michael Jack about the announcement and thought I’d share some thoughts on it here.

 

What Is It?

In short, you can now use DobiMigrate to perform S3 to S3 object storage migrations. It’s flexible too, offering the ability to migrate data from a variety of on-premises object systems up to public cloud object storage, between on-premises systems, or back to on-premises from public cloud storage. There’s support for a variety of S3 systems, including:

In the future Datadobi is looking to add support for AWS Glacier, object locks, object tags, and non-current object versions.

 

Why Would You?

There are quite a few reasons why you might want to move S3 data around. You could be seeing high egress charges from AWS because you’re accessing more data in S3 than you’d initially anticipated. You might be looking to move to the cloud and have a significant on-premises footprint that needs to go. Or you might be looking to replace your on-premises solution with a solution from another vendor.

 

How Would You?

The process used to migrate object is fairly straightforward, and follows a pattern that will be familiar if you’ve done anything with any kind of storage migration tool before. In short, you setup a migration pair (source and destination), run a scan and first copy, then do some incremental copies. Once you’ve got a maintenance window, there’s a cutover where the final scan and copy is done. And then you’re good to go. Basically.

[image courtesy of Datadobi]

 

Final Thoughts

Why am I so interested in these types of offerings? Part of it is that it reminds of all of the time I burnt through earlier in my career migrating data from various storage platforms to other storage platforms. One of the funny things about storage is that there’s rarely enough to service demand, and it rarely delivers the performance you need after it’s been in use for a few years. As such, there’s always some requirement to move data from one spot to another, and to keep that data intact in terms of its permissions, and metadata.

Amazon’s S3 offering has been amazing in terms of bringing object storage to the front of mind of many storage consumers who had previously only used block or file storage. Some of those users are now discovering that, while S3 is great, it can be expensive if you haven’t accounted for egress costs, or you’ve started using a whole lot more of it than initially anticipated. Some companies simply have to take their lumps, as everything is done in public cloud. But for those organisations with some on-premises footprint, the idea of being able to do performance oriented object storage in their own data centre holds a great deal of appeal. But how do you get it back on-premises in a reliable fashion? I believe that’s where Datadobi’s solution really shines.

I’m a fan of software that makes life easier for storage folk. Platform migrations can be a real pain to deal with, and are often riddled with risky propositions and daunting timeframes. Datadobi can’t necessarily change the laws of physics in a way that will keep your project manager happy, but it can do some stuff that means you won’t be quite as broken after a storage migration as you might have been previously. They already had a good story when it came to file storage migration, and the object to object story enhances it. Worth checking out.

Random Short Take #37

Welcome to Random Short Take #37. Not a huge amount of players have worn 37 in the NBA, but Metta World Peace did a few times. When he wasn’t wearing 15, and other odd numbers. But I digress. Let’s get random.

  • Pavilion Data recently added S3 capability to its platform. It’s based on a variant of MinIO, and adds an interesting dimension to what Pavilion Data has traditionally offered. Mellor provided some good coverage here.
  • Speaking of object storage, Dell EMC recently announced ECS 3.5. You can read more on that here. The architectural white paper has been updated to reflect the new version as well.
  • Speaking of Dell EMC, Preston posted a handy article on Data Domain Retention Lock and NetWorker. Have you pre-ordered Preston’s book yet? I’ll keep asking until you do.
  • Online events are all the rage at the moment, and two noteworthy events are coming up shortly: Pure//Accelerate and VeeamON 2020. Speaking of online events, we’re running a virtual BNEVMUG next week. Details on that here. ZertoCON Virtual is also a thing.
  • Speaking of Pure Storage, this article from Cody Hosterman on NVMe and vSphere 7 is lengthy, but definitely worth the read.
  • I can’t recall whether I mentioned that this white paper  covering VCD on VCF 3.9 is available now, and I can’t be bothered checking. So here it is.
  • I’m not just a fan of Backblaze because of its cool consumer backup solution and object storage platform, I’m also a big fan because of its blog. Articles like this one are a great example of companies doing corporate culture right (at least from what I can see).
  • I have the impression that Datadobi has been doing some cool stuff recently, and this story certainly seems to back it up.

Random Short Take #35

Welcome to Random Short Take #35. Some really good players have worn 35 in the NBA, including The Big Dog Antoine Carr, and Reggie Lewis. This one, though, goes out to one of my favourite players from the modern era, Kevin Durant. If it feels like it’s only been a week since the last post, that’s because it has. I bet you wish that I was producing some content that’s more useful than a bunch of links. So do I.

  • I don’t often get excited about funding rounds, but I have a friend who works there, so here’s an article covering the latest round (C) of funding for VAST Data.
  • Datadobi continue to share good news in these challenging times, and has published a success story based on some work it’s done with Payspan.
  • Speaking of challenging times, the nice folks a Retrospect are offering a free 90-day license subscription for Retrospect Backup. You don’t need a credit card to sign up, and “[a]ll backups can be restored, even if the subscription is cancelled”.
  • I loved this post from Russ discussing a recent article on Facebook and learning from network failures at scale. I’m in love with the idea that you can’t automate your way out of misconfiguration. We’ve been talking a lot about this in my day job lately. Automation can be a really exciting concept, but it’s not magic. And as scale increase, so too does the time it takes to troubleshoot issues. It all seems like a straightforward concept, but you’d be surprised how many people are surprised by these ideas.
  • Software continues to dominate the headlines, but hardware still has a role to play in the world. Alastair talks more about that idea here.
  • Paul Stringfellow recently jumped on the Storage Unpacked podcast to talk storage myths versus reality. Worth listening to.
  • It’s not all good news though. Sometimes people make mistakes, and pull out the wrong cables. This is a story I’ll be sharing with my team about resiliency.
  • SMR drives and consumer NAS devices aren’t necessarily the best combo. So this isn’t the best news either. I’m patiently waiting for consumer Flash drive prices to come down. It’s going to take a while though.

 

Datadobi Announces DobiMigrate 5.8 – Introduces Chain of Custody

Datadobi recently announced version 5.8 of its DobiMigrate software and introduced a “Chain of Custody” feature. I had the opportunity to speak to Carl D’Halluin and Michael Jack about the announcement and thought I’d share some thoughts on it here.

 

Don’t They Do File Migration?

If you’re unfamiliar with Datadobi, it’s a company that specialises in NAS migration software. It tends to get used a lot by the major NAS vendors as rock solid method of moving data of a competitor’s box and onto theirs. Datadobi has been around for quite a while, and a lot of the founders have heritage with EMC Centera.

Chain of Custody?

So what exactly does the Chain of Custody feature offer?

  • Tracking files and objects throughout an entire migration
  • Full photo-finish of source and destination system at cutover time
  • Forensic input which can serve as future evidence of tampering
  • Available for all migrations.
    • No performance hit.
    • No enlarged maintenance window.

[image courtesy of Datadobi]

Why Is This Important?

Organisations are subject to a variety of legislative requirements the word over to ensure that the data presented as evidence in courts of law hasn’t been tampered with. Some of them spend an inordinate amount of money ensuring that the document management systems (and the hardware those systems reside on) offer all kinds of compliance and governance features that ensure that you can reliably get up in front of a judge and say that nothing has been messed with. Or you can reliably say that it has been messed with. Either way though, it’s reliable. Unfortunately, nothing lasts forever (not even those Centera cubes we put in years ago).

So what do you do when you have to migrate your data from one platform to another? If you’ve just used rsync or robocopy to get the data from one share to another, how can you reliably prove that you’ve done so, without corrupting or otherwise tampering with the data? Logs are just files, after all, so what’s to stop someone “losing” some data. along the way?

It turns out that a lot of folks in the legal profession have been aware that this was a problem for a while, but they’ve looked the other way. I am no lawyer, but as it was explained to me, if you introduce some doubt into the reliability of the migration process, it’s easy enough for the other side to counter that your stuff may not have been so reliable either, and the whole thing becomes something of a shambles. Of course, there’s likely a more coherent way to explain this, but this is tech blog and I’m being lazy.

 

Thoughts

I’ve done all kinds of data migrations over the years. I think I’ve been fortunate that I’ve never specifically had to deal with a system that was being relied on seriously for legislative reasons, because I’m sure that some of those migrations were done more by the seat of my pants than anything else. Usually the last thing on the organisation’s mind (?) was whether the migration activity was compliant or not. Instead, the focus of the project manager was normally to get the data from the old box to the new box as quickly as possible and with as little drama / downtime as possible.

If you’re working on this stuff in a large financial institution though, you’ll likely have a different focus. And I’m sure the last thing your corporate counsel want to hear is that you’ve been playing a little fast and loose with data over the years. I anticipate this announcement will be greeted with some happiness by people who’ve been saddled with these kinds of daunting tasks in the past. As we move to a more and more digital world, we need to carry some of the concepts from the physical world across. It strikes me that Datadobi has every reason to be excited about this announcement. You can read the press release here.