Cohesity – NAS Data Migration Overview

Data Migration

Cohesity NAS Data Migration, part of SmartFiles, was recently announced as a generally available feature within the Cohesity DataPlatform 6.4 release (after being mentioned in the 6.3 release blog post). The idea behind it is that you can use the feature to perform the migration of NAS data from a primary source to the Cohesity DataPlatform. It is supported for NAS storage registered as SMB or NFS (so it doesn’t necessarily need to be a NAS appliance as such, it can also be a file share hosted somewhere).

 

What To Think About

There are a few things to think about when you configure your migration policy, including:

  • The last time the file was accessed;
  • Last time the file was modified; and
  • The size of the file.

You also need to think about how frequently you want to run the job. Finally, it’s worth considering which View you want the archived data to reside on.

 

What Happens?

When the data is migrated an SMB2 symbolic link is left in place of the file with the same name as the file and the original data is moved to the Cohesity View. Note that on Windows boxes, remote to remote symbolic links are disabled, so you need to run these commands:

C:\Windows\system32>fsutil behavior set SymlinkEvaluation R2R:1
C:\Windows\system32>fsutil behavior query SymlinkEvaluation

Once the data is migrated to the Cohesity cluster, subsequent read and write operations are performed on the Cohesity host. You can move data back to the environment by mounting the Cohesity target View on a Windows client, and copying it back to the NAS.

 

Configuration Steps

To get started, select File Services, and click on Data Migration.

Click on the Migrate Data to configure a migration job.

You’ll need to give it a name.

 

The next step is to select the Source. If you already have a NAS source configured, you’ll see it here. Otherwise you can register a Source.

Click on the arrow to expand the registered NAS mount points.

Select the mount point you’d like to use.

Once you’ve selected the mount point, click on Add.

You then need to select the Storage Domain (formerly known as a ViewBox) to store the archived data on.

You’ll need to provide a name, and configure schedule options.

You can also configure advanced settings, including QoS and exclusions. Once you’re happy, click on Migrate and the job will be created.

You can then run the job immediately, or wait for the schedule to kick in.

 

Other Things To Consider

You’ll need to think about your anti-virus options as well. You can register external anti-virus software or install the anti-virus app from the Cohesity Marketplace

 

Thoughts And Further Reading

Cohesity have long positioned their secondary storage solution as something more than just a backup and recovery solution. There’s some debate about the difference between storage management and data management, but Cohesity seem to have done a good job of introducing yet another feature that can help users easily move data from their primary storage to their secondary storage environment. Plenty of backup solutions have positioned themselves as archive solutions, but many have been focused on moving protection data, rather than primary data from the source. You’ll need to do some careful planning around sizing your environment, as there’s always a chance that an end user will turn up and start accessing files that you thought were stale. And I can’t say with 100% certainty that this solution will transparently work with every line of business application in your environment. But considering it’s aimed at SMB and NFS shares, it looks like it does what it says on the tin, and moves data from one spot to another.

You can read more about the new features in Cohesity DataPlatform 6.4 (Pegasus) on the Cohesity site, and Blocks & Files covered the feature here. Alastair also shared some thoughts on the feature here.

Random Short Take #24

Want some news? In a shorter format? And a little bit random? This listicle might be for you. Welcome to #24 – The Kobe Edition (not a lot of passing, but still entertaining). 8 articles too. Which one was your favourite Kobe? 8 or 24?

  • I wrote an article about how architecture matters years ago. It’s nothing to do with this one from Preston, but he makes some great points about the importance of architecture when looking to protect your public cloud workloads.
  • Commvault GO 2019 was held recently, and Chin-Fah had some thoughts on where Commvault’s at. You can read all about that here. Speaking of Commvault, Keith had some thoughts as well, and you can check them out here.
  • Still on data protection, Alastair posted this article a little while ago about using the Cohesity API for reporting.
  • Cade just posted a great article on using the right transport mode in Veeam Backup & Replication. Goes to show he’s not just a pretty face.
  • VMware vFORUM is coming up in November. I’ll be making the trip down to Sydney to help out with some VMUG stuff. You can find out more here, and register here.
  • Speaking of VMUG, Angelo put together a great 7-part series on VMUG chapter leadership and tips for running successful meetings. You can read part 7 here.
  • This is a great article on managing Rubrik users from the CLI from Frederic Lhoest.
  • Are you into Splunk? And Pure Storage? Vaughn has you covered with an overview of Splunk SmartStore on Pure Storage here.

Random Short Take #18

Here are some links to some random news items and other content that I recently found interesting. You might find them interesting too. Episode 18 – buckle up kids! It’s all happening.

  • Cohesity added support for Active Directory protection with version 6.3 of the DataPlatform. Matt covered it pretty comprehensively here.
  • Speaking of Cohesity, Alastair wrote this article on getting started with the Cohesity PowerShell Module.
  • In keeping with the data protection theme (hey, it’s what I’m into), here’s a great article from W. Curtis Preston on SaaS data protection, and what you need to consider to not become another cautionary tale on the Internet. Curtis has written a lot about data protection over the years, and you could do a lot worse than reading what he has to say. And that’s not just because he signed a book for me.
  • Did you ever stop and think just how insecure some of the things that you put your money into are? It’s a little scary. Shell are doing some stuff with Cybera to improve things. Read more about that here.
  • I used to work with Vincent, and he’s a super smart guy. I’ve been at him for years to start blogging, and he’s started to put out some articles. He’s very good at taking complex topics and distilling them down to something that’s easy to understand. Here’s his summary of VMware vRealize Automation configuration.
  • Tom’s take on some recent CloudFlare outages makes for good reading.
  • Google Cloud has announced it’s acquiring Elastifile. That part of the business doesn’t seem to be as brutal as the broader Alphabet group when it comes to acquiring and discarding companies, and I’m hoping that the good folks at Elastifile are looked after. You can read more on that here.
  • A lot of people are getting upset with terms like “disaggregated HCI”. Chris Mellor does a bang up job explaining the differences between the various architectures here. It’s my belief that there’s a place for all of this, and assuming that one architecture will suit every situation is a little naive. But what do I know?

Random Short Take #17

Here are some links to some random news items and other content that I recently found interesting. You might find them interesting too. Episode 17 – am I over-sharing? There’s so much I want you to know about.

  • I seem to always be including a link from the Backblaze blog. That’s mainly because they write about things I’m interested in. In this case, they’ve posted an article discussing the differences between availability and durability that I think is worth your time.
  • Speaking of interesting topics, Preston posted an article on NetWorker Pools with Data Domain that’s worth looking at if you’re into that kind of thing.
  • Maintaining the data protection theme, Alastair wrote an interesting article titled “The Best Automation Is One You Don’t Write” (you know, like the best IO is one you don’t need to do?) as part of his work with Cohesity. It’s a good article, and not just because he mentions my name in it.
  • I recently wanted to change the edition of Microsoft Office I was using on my MacBook Pro and couldn’t really work out how to do it. In the end, the answer is simple. Download a Microsoft utility to remove your Office licenses, and then fire up an Office product and it will prompt you to re-enter your information at that point.
  • This is an old article, but it answered my question about validating MD5 checksums on macOS.
  • Excelero have been doing some cool stuff with Imperial College London – you can read more about that here.
  • Oh hey, Flixster Video is closing down. I received this in my inbox recently: “[f]ollowing the announcement by UltraViolet that it will be discontinuing its service on July 31, 2019, we are writing to provide you notice that Flixster Video is planning to shut down its website, applications and operations on October 31, 2019”. It makes sense, obviously, given UltraViolet’s demise, but it still drives me nuts. The ephemeral nature of digital media is why I still have a house full of various sized discs with various kinds of media stored on them. I think the answer is to give yourself over to the streaming lifestyle, and understand that you’ll never “own” media like you used to think you did. But I can’t help but feel like people outside of the US are getting shafted in that scenario.
  • In keeping up with the “random” theme of these posts, it was only last week that I learned that “Television, the Drug of the Nation” from the very excellent album “Hypocrisy Is the Greatest Luxury” by The Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy was originally released by Michael Franti and Rono Tse when they were members of The Beatnigs. If you’re unfamiliar with any of this I recommend you check them out.

Cohesity Basics – Configuring An External Target For Cloud Archive

I’ve been working in the lab with Pure Storage’s ObjectEngine and thought it might be nice to document the process to set it up as an external target for use with Cohesity’s Cloud Archive capability. I’ve written in the past about Cloud Tier and Cloud Archive, but in that article I focused more on the Cloud Tier capability. I don’t want to sound too pretentious, but I’ll quote myself from the other article: “With Cloud Archive you can send copies of snapshots up to the cloud to keep as a copy separate to the backup data you might have replicated to a secondary appliance. This is useful if you have some requirement to keep a monthly or six-monthly copy somewhere for compliance reasons.”

I would like to be clear that this process hasn’t been blessed or vetted by Pure Storage or Cohesity. I imagine they are working on delivering a validated solution at some stage, as they have with Veeam and Commvault. So don’t go out and jam this in production and complain to me when Pure or Cohesity tell you it’s wrong.

There are a couple of ways you can configure an external target via the Cohesity UI. In this example, I’ll do it from the dashboard, rather than during the protection job configuration. Click on Protection and select External Target.

You’ll then be presented with the New Target configuration dialogue.

In this example, I’m calling my external target PureOE, and setting its purpose as Archival (as opposed to Tiering).

The Type of target is “S3 Compatible”.

Once you select that, you’ll be asked for a bunch of S3-type information, including Bucket Name and Access Key ID. This assumes you’ve already created the bucket and configured appropriate security on the ObjectEngine side of things.

Enter the required information. I’ve de-selected compression and source side deduplication, as I’m wanting that the data reduction to be done by the ObjectEngine. I’ve also disabled encryption, as I’m guessing this will have an impact on the ObjectEngine as well. I need to confirm that with my friends at Pure. I’m using the fully qualified domain name of the ObjectEngine as the endpoint here as well.

Once you click on Register, you’ll be presented with a summary of the configuration.

You’re then right to use this as an external target for Archival parts of protection jobs within your Cohesity environment. Once you’ve run a few protection jobs, you should start to see files within the test bucket on the ObjectEngine. Don’t forget that, as fas as I’m aware, it’s still very difficult (impossible?) to remove external targets from the the Cohesity Data Platform, so don’t get too carried away with configuring a bunch of different test targets thinking that you can remove them later.

Random Short Take #16

Here are a few links to some random news items and other content that I recently found interesting. You might find them interesting too. Episode 16 – please enjoy these semi-irregular updates.

  • Scale Computing has been doing a bit in the healthcare sector lately – you can read news about that here.
  • This was a nice roundup of the news from Apple’s recent WWDC from Six Colors. Hat tip to Stephen Foskett for the link. Speaking of WWDC news, you may have been wondering what happened to all of your purchased content with the imminent demise of iTunes on macOS. It’s still a little fuzzy, but this article attempts to shed some light on things. Spoiler: you should be okay (for the moment).
  • There’s a great post on the Dropbox Tech Blog from James Cowling discussing the mission versus the system.
  • The more things change, the more they remain the same. For years I had a Windows PC running Media Center and recording TV. I used IceTV as the XMLTV-based program guide provider. I then started to mess about with some HDHomeRun devices and the PC died and I went back to a traditional DVR arrangement. Plex now has DVR capabilities and it has been doing a reasonable job with guide data (and recording in general), but they’ve decided it’s all a bit too hard to curate guides and want users (at least in Australia) to use XMLTV-based guides instead. So I’m back to using IceTV with Plex. They’re offering a free trial at the moment for Plex users, and setup instructions are here. No, I don’t get paid if you click on the links.
  • Speaking of axe-throwing, the Cohesity team in Queensland is organising a social event for Friday 21st June from 2 – 4 pm at Maniax Axe Throwing in Newstead. You can get in contact with Casey if you’d like to register.
  • VeeamON Forum Australia is coming up soon. It will be held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Sydney on July 24th and should be a great event. You can find out more information and register for it here. The Vanguards are also planning something cool, so hopefully we’ll see you there.
  • Speaking of Veeam, Anthony Spiteri recently published his longest title in the Virtualization is Life! catalogue – Orchestration Of NSX By Terraform For Cloud Connect Replication With vCloud Director. It’s a great article, and worth checking out.
  • There’s a lot of talk and slideware devoted to digital transformation, and a lot of it is rubbish. But I found this article from Chin-Fah to be particularly insightful.

Cohesity Basics – Excluding VMs Using Tags – Real World Example

I’ve written before about using VM tags with Cohesity to exclude VMs from a backup. I wanted to write up a quick article using a real world example in the test lab. In this instance, we had someone deploying 200 VMs over a weekend to test a vendor’s storage array with a particular workload. The problem was that I had Cohesity set to automatically protect any new VMs that are deployed in the lab. This wasn’t a problem from a scalability perspective. Rather, the problem was that we were backing up a bunch of test data that didn’t dedupe well and didn’t need to be protected by what are ultimately finite resources.

As I pointed out in the other article, creating tags for VMs and using them as a way to exclude workloads from Cohesity is not a new concept, and is fairly easy to do. You can also apply the tags in bulk using the vSphere Web Client if you need to. But a quicker way to do it (and something that can be done post-deployment) is to use PowerCLI to search for VMs with a particular naming convention and apply the tags to those.

Firstly, you’ll need to log in to your vCenter.

PowerCLI C:\> Connect-VIServer vCenter

In this example, the test VMs are deployed with the prefix “PSV”, so this makes it easy enough to search for them.

PowerCLI C:\> get-vm | where {$_.name -like "PSV*"} | New-TagAssignment -Tag "COH-NoBackup"

This assumes that the tag already exists on the vCenter side of things, and you have sufficient permissions to apply tags to VMs. You can check your work with the following command.

PowerCLI C:\> get-vm | where {$_.name -like "PSV*"} | Get-TagAssignment

One thing to note. If you’ve updated the tags of a bunch of VMs in your vCenter environment, you may notice that the objects aren’t immediately excluded from the Protection Job on the Cohesity side of things. The reason for this is that, by default, Cohesity only refreshes vCenter source data every 4 hours. One way to force the update is to manually refresh the source vCenter in Cohesity. To do this, go to Protection -> Sources. Click on the ellipsis on the right-hand side of your vCenter source you’d like to refresh, and select Refresh.

You’ll then see that the tagged VMs are excluded in the Protection Job. Hat tip to my colleague Mike for his help with PowerCLI. And hat tip to my other colleague Mike for causing the problem in the first place.

Random Short Take #14

Here are a few links to some random news items and other content that I found interesting. You might find them interesting too. Episode 14 – giddy-up!

Brisbane VMUG – May 2019

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The May 2019 edition of the Brisbane VMUG meeting will be held on Tuesday 28th May at Fishburners from 4pm – 6pm. It’s sponsored by Cohesity and promises to be a great afternoon.

Here’s the agenda:

  • VMUG Intro
  • Cohesity Presentation: Changing Data Protection from Nightmares to Sweet Dreams
  • vCommunity Presentation – Introduction to Hyper-converged Infrastructure
  • Q&A
  • Light refreshments.

Cohesity have gone to great lengths to make sure this will be a fun and informative session and I’m really looking forward to hearing about how they can make recovery simple. You can find out more information and register for the event here. I hope to see you there. Also, if you’re interested in sponsoring one of these events, please get in touch with me and I can help make it happen.

Random Short Take #13

Here are a few links to some random news items and other content that I found interesting. You might find them interesting too. Let’s dive in to lucky number 13.