Zerto Announces 8.5 and Zerto Data Protection

Zerto recently announced 8.5 of its product, along with a new offering, Zerto Data Protection (ZDP). I had the good fortune to catch up with Caroline Seymour (VP, Product Marketing) about the news and thought I’d share some thoughts here.

 

ZDP, Yeah You Know Me

Global Pandemic for $200 Please, Alex

In “these uncertain times”, organisations are facing new challenges

  • No downtime, no data loss, 24/7 availability
  • Influx of remote work
  • Data growth and sprawl
  • Security threats
  • Acceleration of cloud

Many of these things were already a problem, and the global pandemic has done a great job highlighting them.

“Legacy Architecture”

Zerto paints a bleak picture of the “legacy architecture” adopted by many of the traditional dat protection solutions, positing that many IT shops need to use a variety of tools to get to a point where operations staff can sleep better at night. Disaster recovery, for example, is frequently handled via replication for mission-critical applications, with backup being performed via periodic snapshots for all other applications. ZDP aims to being all this together under one banner of continuous data protection, delivering:

  • Local continuous backup and long-term retention (LTR) to public cloud; and
  • Pricing optimised for backup.

[image courtesy of Zerto]

Features

[image courtesy of Zerto]

So what do you get with ZDP? Some neat features, including:

  • Continuous backup with journal
  • Instant restore from local journal
  • Application consistent recovery
  • Short-term SLA policy settings
  • Intelligent index and search
  • LTR to disk, object or Cloud (Azure, AWS)
  • LTR policies, daily incremental with weekly, monthly or yearly fulls
  • Data protection workflows

 

New Licensing

It wouldn’t be a new software product without some mention of new licensing. If you want to use ZDP, you get:

  • Backup for short-term retention and LTR;
  • On-premises or backup to cloud;
  • Analytics; and
  • Orchestration and automation for backup functions.

If you’re sticking with (the existing) Zerto Cloud Edition, you get:

  • Everything in ZDP;
  • Disaster Recovery for on-premises and cloud;
  • Multi-cloud support; and
  • Orchestration and automation.

 

Zerto 8.5

A big focus of Zerto’s recently has been VMware on public cloud support, including the various flavours of VMware on Azure, AWS, and Oracle Cloud. There are a bunch of reasons why this approach has proven popular with existing VMware customers looking to migrate from on-premises to public cloud, including:

  • Native VMware support – run existing VMware workloads natively on IaaS;
  • Policies and configuration don’t need to change;
  • Minimal changes – no need to refactor applications; and
  • IaaS benefits- reliability, scale, and operational model.

[image courtesy of Zerto]

New in 8.5

With 8.5, you can now backup directly to Microsoft Azure and AWS. You also get instant file and folder restores to production. There’s now support for VMware on public cloud disaster recovery and data protection for Microsoft Azure VMware Solution, Google Cloud VMware Engine, and the Oracle Cloud VMware Solution. You also get platform automation and lifecycle management features, including:

  • Auto-evacuate for recovery hosts;
  • Auto-populate for recovery hosts; and
  • Encryption capabilities.

And finally, a Zerto PowerShell Cmdlets Module has also been released.

 

Thoughts and Further Reading

The writing’s been on the wall for some time that Zerto might need to expand its solution offering to incorporate backup and recovery. Continuous data protection is a great feature and my experience with Zerto has been that it does what it says on the tin. The market, however, is looking for ways to consolidate solution offerings in order to save a few more dollarydoos and keep the finance department happy. I haven’t seen the street pricing for ZDP, but Seymour seemed confident that it stacks up well against the more traditional data protection options on the market, particularly when compared against offerings that incorporate components that deal with CDP and periodic data protection with different tools. There’s a new TCO calculator on the Zerto website, and there’s also the opportunity to talk to a Zerto account representative about your particular needs.

I’ve always treated regular backup and recovery and disaster recovery as very different things, mainly because they are. Companies frequently make the mistake of trying to cobble together some kind of DR solution using traditional backup and recovery tools. I’m interested to see how Zerto goes with this approach. It’s not the first company to converge elements that fit in the data protection space together, and it will be interesting to see how much of the initial uptake of ZDP is with existing customers or net new logos. The broadening of support for the VMware on X public cloud workloads is good news for enterprises too (putting aside my thoughts on whether or not that’s a great long term strategy for said enterprises). There’s some interesting stuff happening, and I’m looking forward to see how the story unfolds over the next 6 – 12 months.

Pure Storage Acquires Portworx

Pure Storage announced its intention to acquire Portworx in mid-September. Around that time I had the opportunity to talk about the news with Goutham Rao (Portworx CTO) and Matt Kixmoeller (Pure Storage VP, Strategy) and thought I’d share some brief thoughts here.

 

The News

Pure and Portworx have entered an agreement that will see Pure pay approximately $370M US in cash. Portworx will form a new Cloud Native Business Unit inside Pure to be led by Portworx CEO Murli Thirumale. All Portworx founders are joining Pure, with Pure investing significantly to grow the new business unit. According to Pure, “Portworx software to continue as-is, supporting deployments in any cloud and on-premises, and on any bare metal, VM, or array-based storage”. It was also noted that “Portworx solutions to be integrated with Pure yet maintain a commitment to an open ecosystem”.

About Portworx

Described as the “leading Kubernetes data services platform”, Portworx was founded in 2014 in Los Altos, CA. It runs a 100% software, subscription, and cloud business model with development and support sites in California, India, and Eastern Europe. The product has been GA since 2017, and is used by some of the largest enterprise and Cloud / SaaS companies globally.

 

What’s A Portworx?

The idea behind Portworx is that it gives you data services for any application, on any Kubernetes distribution, running on any cloud, any infrastructure, and at any stage of the application lifecycle. To that end, it’s broken up into a bunch of different components, and runs in the K8s control plane adjacent to the applications.

PX-Store

  • Software-defined storage layer that automates container storage for developers and admins
  • Consistent storage APIs: cloud, bare metal, or arrays

PX-Migrate

  • Easily move applications between clusters
  • Enables hybrid cloud and multi-cloud mobility

PX-Backup

  • Application-consistent backup for cloud native apps with all k8s artefacts and state
  • Backup to any cloud or on-premises object storage

PX-Secure

  • Implement consistent encryption and security policies across clouds
  • Enable multi-tenancy with access controls

PX-DR

  • Sync and async replication between Availability Zones and regions
  • Zero RPO active / active for high resiliency

PX-Autopilot

  • GitOps-driven automation allows for easier platform for non-storage experts to deploy stateful applications, monitors everything about an application, reacts and prevents problems from happening
  • Auto-scale storage as your app grows to reduce costs

 

How It Fits Together

When you bring Portworx into the Pure Storage picture, you start to see that it fits well with the existing Pure Storage picture. In the picture below you’ll also see support for the standard container storage interface (CSI) to work with other vendors.

[image courtesy of Pure Storage]

Also worth noting is that PX-Essentials remains free forever for workloads under 5TB and 5 nodes).

 

Thoughts and Further Reading

I think this is a great move by Pure, mainly because it lends them a whole lot more credibility with the DevOps folks. Pure was starting to make inroads with Pure Storage Orchestrator, and I think this move will strengthen that story. Giving Portworx access to Pure’s salesforce globally is also going to broaden its visibility in the market and open up doors to markets that may have been difficult to get into previously.

Persistent storage for containers is heating up. As Rao pointed out in our discussion, “as container adoption grows, storage becomes a problem”. Portworx already had a good story to tell in this space, and Pure is no slouch when it comes to delivering advanced storage capabilities across a variety of platforms. I like that the messaging has been firmly based in maintaining the openness of the platform and I’m interested to see what other integrations happen as the two companies start working more closely together. If you’d like another perspective on the news, check out Chris Evans’s article here.

Rancher Labs Announces 2.5

Rancher Labs recently announced version 2.5 of its platform. I had the opportunity to catch up with co-founder and CEO Sheng Liang about the release and other things that Rancher has been up to and thought I’d share some of my notes here.

 

Introducing Rancher Labs 2.5

Liang described Rancher as a way for organisations to “[f]ocus on enriching their own apps, rather than trying to be a day 1, day 2 K8s outfit”. With that thinking in mind, the new features in 2.5 are as follows:

  1. Rancher now installs everywhere – on EKS, OpenShift, whatever – and they’ve removed a bunch of dependencies. Rancher 2.5 can now be installed on any CNCF-certified Kubernetes cluster, eliminating the need to set up a separate Kubernetes cluster before installing Rancher. The new lightweight installation experience is useful for users who already have access to a cloud-managed Kubernetes service like EKS.
  2. Enhanced management for EKS. Rancher Labs was a launch partner for EKS and used to treat it like a dumb distribution. The management architecture has been revamped with improved lifecycle management for EKS. It now uses the native EKS way of doing various things and only adds value where it’s not already present.
  3. Managing edge clusters. Liang described K3s as “almost the goto distribution for edge computing (5G, IoT, ATMs, etc)”. When you get into some of these scenarios, the scale of operations is becoming pretty big. You need to re-think multi-cluster management when you have that in place. Rancher has introduced a GitOps framework to do that. “GitOps at scale” – created its own GitOp framework to accommodate the required scale.
  4. K8s has plenty of traction in government and high security environments, hence the development of RKE Government Edition.

 

Other Notes

Liang mentioned that Longhorn uptake (made generally available in May 2020) has been great, with over 10000 active deployments (not just downloads) in the wild now. He noted that persistent storage with K8s has been hard to do, and Longhorn has gone some way to improving that experience. K3s is now a CNCF Sandbox project, not just a Rancher project, and this has certainly helped with its popularity as well. He also mentioned the acquisition by SUSE was continuing to progress, and expected it would be closed in Q4, 2020.

 

Thoughts and Further Reading

Longtime readers of this blog will know that my background is fairly well entrenched in infrastructure as opposed to cloud-native technologies. Liang understands this, and always does a pretty good job of translating some of the concepts he talks about with me back into infrastructure terms. The world continues to change, though, and the popularity of Kubernetes and solutions like Rancher Labs highlights that it’s no longer a simple conversation about LUNs, CPUs, network throughput and which server I’ll use to host my application. Organisations are looking for effective ways to get the most out of their technology investment, and Kubernetes can provide an extremely effective way of deploying and running containerised applications in an agile and efficient fashion. That said, the bar for entry into the cloud-native world can still be considered pretty high, particularly when you need to do things at large scale. This is where I think platforms like the one from Rancher Labs make so much sense. I may have described some elements of cloud-native architecture as a bin fire previously, but I think the progress that Rancher is making demonstrates just how far we’ve come. I know that VMware and Kubernetes has little in common, but it strikes me that we’re seeing the same development progress that we saw 15 years ago with VMware (and ESX in particular). I remember at the time that VMware seemed like a whole bunch of weird to many infrastructure folks, and it wasn’t until much later that these same people were happily using VMware in every part of the data centre. I suspect that the adoption of Kubernetes (and useful management frameworks for it) will be a bit quicker than that, but it’s going to be heavily reliant on solutions like this to broaden the appeal of what’s a very useful (but nonetheless challenging) container deployment and management ecosystem.

If you’re in the APAC region, Rancher is hosting a webinar in a friendly timezone later this month. You can get more details on that here. And if you’re on US Eastern time, there’s the “Computing on the Edge with Kubernetes” one day event that’s worth checking out.

Random Short Take #44

Welcome to Random Short Take #44. A few players have worn 44 in the NBA, including Danny Ainge and Pistol Pete, but my favourite from this list is Keith Van Horn.  A nice shooting touch and strong long sock game. Let’s get random.

  • ATMs are just computers built to give you money. And it’s scary to think of the platforms that are used to deliver that functionality. El Reg pointed out a recent problem with one spotted in the wild in Ngunnawal.
  • Speaking of computing at the edge, I found this piece from Keith interesting. As much as things change they stay the same. I think he’s spot on when he says “[m]anufacturers and technology companies must come together with modular solutions that enable software upgrades for these assets’ lives”. We need to be demanding more from the industry when it comes to some of this stuff.
  • Heard about Project Monterey at VMworld and wanted to know more? Pensando has you covered.
  • I enjoyed this article from Preston about the difference between bunkers and vaults – worth checking out even if you’re not a Dell EMC customer.
  • Cloud – it can be tough to know which way to go. And a whole bunch of people have an interest in you using their particular solution. This article from Chris Evans was particularly insightful.
  • DH2i has launched DxOdyssey for IoT – you can read more about that here.
  • Speaking of news, Retrospect recently announced Backup 17.5 too. There are some cloud improvements, and support for macOS Big Sur beta.
  • It’s the 30th anniversary of Vanilla Ice’s “Ice Ice Baby“, and like me you were probably looking for a comprehensive retrospective on Vanilla Ice’s career. Look no further than this article over at The Ringer.

Rancher Labs Announces Longhorn General Availability

This happened a little while ago, and the news about Rancher Labs has shifted to Suse’s announcement regarding its intent to acquire Rancher Labs. Nonetheless, I had a chance to speak to Sheng Liang (Co-founder and CEO) about Longhorn’s general availability, and thought I’d share some thoughts here.

 

What Is It?

Described by Rancher Labs as “an enterprise-grade, cloud-native container storage solution”, Longhorn has been in development for around 6 years, in beta for a year, and is now generally available. It’s comprised of around 40k lines of Golang code, and each volume is a set of independent micro-services, orchestrated by Kubernetes.

Liang described this to me as “enterprise-grade distributed block storage for K8S”, and the features certainly seem to line up with those expectations. There’s support for:

  • Thin-provisioning, snapshots, backup, and restore
  • Non-disruptive volume expansion
  • Cross-cluster disaster recovery volume with defined RTO and RPO
  • Live upgrade of Longhorn software without impacting running volumes
  • Full-featured Kubernetes CLI integration and standalone UI

From a licensing perspective, Longhorn is free to download and use, and customers looking for support can purchase a premium support model with the same SLAs provided through Rancher Support Services. There are no licensing fees, and node-based subscription pricing keeps costs to a minimum.

Use Cases

Why would you use it?

  • Bare metal workloads
  • Edge persistent
  • Geo-replicated storage for Amazon EKS
  • Application backup and disaster recovery

 

Thoughts

One of the barriers to entry when moving from traditional infrastructure to cloud-native is that concepts seem slightly different to the comfortable slippers you may have been used to in enterprise infrastructure land. The neat thing about Longhorn is that it leverages a lot of the same concepts you’ll see in traditional storage deployments to deliver resilient and scalable persistent storage for Kubernetes.

This doesn’t mean that Rancher Labs is trying to compete with traditional storage vendors like Pure Storage and NetApp when it comes to delivering persistent storage for cloud workloads. Liang acknowledges that these shops can offer more storage features than Longhorn can. There seems to be nonetheless a requirement for this kind of accessible and robust solution. Plus it’s 100% open source.

Rancher Labs already has a good story to tell when it comes to making Kubernetes management a whole lot simpler. The addition of Longhorn simply improves that story further. If you’re feeling curious about Longhorn and would like to know more, this website has a lot of useful information.

Komprise Announces Cloud Capability

Komprise recently made some announcements around extending its product to cloud. I had the opportunity to speak to Krishna Subramanian (President and COO) about the news and I thought I’d share some of my thoughts here.

 

The Announcement

Komprise has traditionally focused on unstructured data stored on-premises. It has now extended the capabilities of Komprise Intelligent Data Management to include cloud data. There’s currently support for Amazon S3 and Wasabi, with Google Cloud, Microsoft Azure, and IBM support coming soon.

 

Benefits

So what do you get with this capability?

Analyse data usage across cloud accounts and buckets easily

  • Single view across cloud accounts, buckets, and storage classes
  • Analyse AWS usage by various metrics accurately based on access times
  • Explore different data archival, replication, and deletion strategies with instant cost projections

Optimise AWS costs with analytics-driven archiving

  • Continuously move objects by policy across Cloud Network Attached Storage (NAS), Amazon S3, Amazon S3 Standard-IA, Amazon S3 Glacier, and Amazon S3 Glacier DeepArchive
  • Minimise costs and penalties by moving data at the right time based on access patterns

Bridge to Big Data/Artificial Intelligence (AI) projects

  • Create virtual data lakes for Big Data, AI – search for exactly what you need across cloud accounts and buckets
  • Native access to moved data on each storage class with full data fidelity

Create Cyber Resiliency with AWS

  • Copy S3 data to AWS to protect from ransomware with an air-gapped copy

[image courtesy of Komprise]

 

Why Is This Good?

The move to cloud storage hasn’t been all beer and skittles for enterprise. Storing large amounts of data in public cloud presents enterprises with a number of challenges, including:

  • Poor visibility – “Bucket sprawl”
  • Insufficient data – Cloud does not easily track last access / data use
  • Cost complexity – Manual data movement can lead to unexpected retrieval cost surprises
  • Labour – Manually moving data is error-prone and time-consuming

Sample Use Cases

Some other reasons you might want to have Komprise manage your data include:

  • Finding ex-employee data stored in buckets.
  • Data migration – you might want to take a copy of your data from Wasabi to AWS.

There’s support for all unstructured data (file and object), so the benefits of Komprise can be enjoyed regardless of how you’re storing your unstructured data. It’s also important to note that there’s no change to the existing licensing model, you’re just now able to use the product on public cloud storage.

 

Thoughts

Effective data management remains a big challenge for enterprises. It’s no secret that public cloud storage is really just storage that lives in another company’s data centre. Sure, it might be object storage, rather than file based, but it’s still just a bunch of unstructured data sitting in another company’s data centre. The way you consume that data may have changed, and certainly the way you pay for it has changed, but fundamentally it’s still your unstructured data sitting on a share or a filesystem. The problems you had on-premises though, still manifest in public cloud environments (i.e. data sprawl, capacity issues, etc). That’s why the Komprise solution seems so compelling when it comes to managing your on-premises storage consumption, and extending that capability to cloud storage is a no-brainer. When it comes to storing unstructured data, it’s frequently a bin fire of some sort or another. The reason for this is because it doesn’t scale well. I don’t mean the storage doesn’t scale – you can store petabytes all over the place if you like. But if you’re still hand crafting your shares and manually moving data around, you’ll notice that it becomes more and more time consuming as time goes on (and your data storage needs grow).

One way to address this challenge is to introduce a level of automation, which is something that Komprise does quite well. If you’ve got many terabytes of data stored on-premises and in AWS buckets (or you’re looking to move some old data from on-premises to the cloud) and you’re not quite sure what it’s all for or how best to go about it, Komprise can certainly help you out.

Spectro Cloud – Profile-Based Kubernetes Management For The Enterprise

 

Spectro Cloud launched in March. I recently had the opportunity to speak to Tenry Fu (CEO) and Tina Nolte (VP, Products) about the launch, and what Spectro Cloud is, and thought I’d share some notes here.

 

The Problem?

I was going to start this article by saying that Kubernetes in the enterprise is a bin fire, but that’s too harsh (and entirely unfair on the folks who are doing it well). There is, however, a frequent compromise being made between ease of use, control, and visibility.

[image courtesy of Spectro Cloud]

According to Fu, the way that enterprises consume Kubernetes shouldn’t just be on the left or the right side of the diagram. There is a way to do both.

 

The Solution?

According to the team, Spectro Cloud is “a SaaS platform that gives Enterprises control over Kubernetes infrastructure stack integrations, consistently and at scale”. What does that mean though? Well, you get access to the “table stakes” SaaS management, including:

  • Managed Kubernetes experience;
  • Multi-cluster and environment management; and
  • Enterprise features.

Profile-Based Management

You also get some cool stuff that heavily leverages profile-based management, including infrastructure stack modelling and lifecycle management that can be done based on integration policies. In short, you build cluster profiles and then apply them to your infrastructure. The cluster profile usually describes the OS flavour and version, Kubernetes version, storage configuration, networking drivers, and so on. The Pallet orchestrator then ensures these profiles are used to maintain the desired cluster state. There are also security-hardened profiles available out of the box.

If you’re a VMware-based cloud user, the appliance (deployed from an OVA file) sits in your on-premises VMware cloud environment and communicates with the Spectro Cloud SaaS offering over TLS, and the cloud properties are dynamically propagated.

Licensing

The solution is licensed on the number of worker node cores under management. This is tiered based on the number of cores and it follows a simple model: More cores and a longer commitment equals a bigger discount.

 

The Differentiator?

Current Kubernetes deployment options vary in their complexity and maturity. You can take the DIY path, but you might find that this option is difficult to maintain at scale. There are packaged options available, such as VMware Tanzu, but you might find that multi-cluster management is not always a focus. The managed Kubernetes option (such as those offered by Google and AWS) has its appeal to the enterprise crowd, but those offerings are normally quite restricted in terms of technology offerings and available versions.

Why does Spectro Cloud have appeal as a solution then? Because you get control over the integrations you might want to use with your infrastructure, but also get the warm and fuzzy feeling of leveraging a managed service experience.

 

Thoughts

I’m no great fan of complexity for complexity’s sake, particularly when it comes to enterprise IT deployments. That said, there are always reasons why things get complicated in the enterprise. Requirements come from all parts of the business, legacy applications need to be fed and watered, rules and regulations seem to be in place simply to make things difficult. Enterprise application owners crave solutions like Kubernetes because there’s some hope that they, too, can deliver modern applications if only they used some modern application deployment and management constructs. Unfortunately, Kubernetes can be a real pain in the rear to get right, particularly at scale. And if enterprise has taught us anything, it’s that most enterprise shops are struggling to do the basics well, let alone the needlessly complicated stuff.

Solutions like the one from Spectro Cloud aren’t a silver bullet for enterprise organisations looking to modernise the way applications are deployed, scaled, and managed. But something like Spectro Cloud certainly has great appeal given the inherent difficulties you’re likely to experience if you’re coming at this from a standing start. Sure, if you’re a mature Kubernetes shop, chances are slim that you really need something like this. But if you’re still new to it, or are finding that the managed offerings don’t give you the flexibility you might need, then something like Spectro Cloud could be just what you’re looking for.

Backblaze B2 And A Happy Customer

Backblaze recently published a case study with AK Productions. I had the opportunity to speak to Aiden Korotkin and thought I’d share some of my notes here.

 

The Problem

Korotkin’s problem was a fairly common one – he had lots of data from previous projects that had built up over the years. He’d been using a bunch of external drives to store this data, and had had a couple of external drives fail, including the backup drives. Google’s cloud storage option “seemed like a more redundant and safer investment financially to go into the cloud space”. He was already using G Suite. And so he migrated his old projects off hard drives and into the cloud. He had a credit with Google for a year to use its cloud platform. It became pretty expensive after that, not really feasible. Korotkin also stated that calculating the expected costs was difficult. He also felt that he needed to find something more private / secure.

 

The Solution

So how did he come by Backblaze? He did a bunch of research. Backblaze B2 consistently showed up in the top 15 results when online magazines were publishing their guides to cloud storage. He’d heard of it before, possibly seen a demo. The technology seemed very streamlined, exactly what he needed for his business. A bonus was that there were no extra steps to backup his QNAP NAS as well. This seemed like the best option.

Current Workflow

I asked Korotkin to walk me though his current workflow. B2 is being used as a backup target for the moment. Physics being what it is, it’s still “[h]ard to do video editing direct on the cloud”. The QNAP NAS houses current projects, with data mirrored to B2. Archives are uploaded to a different area of B2. After time, data is completely archived to the cloud.

How About Ingest?

Korotkin needed to move 12TB from Google to Backblaze. He used Flexify.IO to transfer from one cloud to the next. They walked him through how to do it. The good news is that they were able to do it in 12 hours.

It’s About Support

Korotkin noted that between Backblaze and Flexify.IO “the tech support experience was incredible”. He said that he “[f]elt like I was very much taken care of”. He got the strong impression that the support staff enjoyed helping him, and were with him through every step of the way. The most frustrating part of the migration, according to Korotkin, was dealing with Google generally. The offloading of the data from Google cost more money than he’s paid to date with Backblaze. “As a small business owner I don’t have $1500 just to throw away”.

 

Thoughts

I’ve been a fan of Backblaze for some time. I’m a happy customer when it comes to the consumer backup product, and I’ve always enjoyed the transparency it’s displayed as a company with regards to its pod designs and the process required to get to where it is today. I remain fascinated by the workflows required to do multimedia content creation successfully, and I think this story is a great tribute to the support culture of Backblaze. It’s nice to see that smaller shops, such as Korotkin’s, are afforded the same kind of care and support experience as some of the bigger customers might. This is a noticeable point of distinction when compared to working with the hyperscalers. It’s not that those folks aren’t happy to help, they’re just operating at a different level.

Korotkin’s approach was not unreasonable, or unusual, particularly for content creators. Keeping data safe is a challenge for small business, and solutions that make storing and protecting data easier are going to be popular. Korotkin’s story is a good one, and I’m always happy to hear these kinds of stories. If you find yourself shuffling external drives, or need a lot of capacity but don’t want to invest too heavily in on-premises storage, Backblaze has a good story in terms of both cloud storage and data protection.

Random Short Take #34

Welcome to Random Short Take #34. Some really good players have worn 34 in the NBA, including Ray Allen and Sir Charles. This one, though, goes out to my favourite enforcer, Charles Oakley. If it feels like it’s only been a week since the last post, that’s because it has.

  • I spoke to the folks at Rancher Labs a little while ago, and they’re doing some stuff around what they call “Edge Scalability” and have also announced Series D funding.
  • April Fool’s is always a bit of a trying time, what with a lot of the world being a few timezones removed from where I live. Invariably I stop checking news sites for a few days to be sure. Backblaze recognised that these are strange times, and decided to have some fun with their releases, rather than trying to fool people outright. I found the post on Catblaze Cloud Backup inspiring.
  • Hal Yaman announced the availability of version 2.6 of his Office 365 Backup sizing tool. Speaking of Veeam and handy utilities, the Veeam Extract utility is now available as a standalone tool. Cade talks about that here.
  • VMware vSphere 7 recently went GA. Here’s a handy article covering what it means for VMware cloud providers.
  • Speaking of VMware things, John Nicholson wrote a great article on SMB and vSAN (I can’t bring myself to write CIFS, even when I know why it’s being referred to that way).
  • Scale is infinite, until it isn’t. Azure had some minor issues recently, and Keith Townsend shared some thoughts on the situation.
  • StorMagic recently announced that it has acquired KeyNexus. It also announced the availability of SvKMS, a key management system for edge, DC, and cloud solutions.
  • Joey D’Antoni, in collaboration with DH2i, is delivering a webinar titled “Overcoming the HA/DR and Networking Challenges of SQL Server on Linux”. It’s being held on Wednesday 15th April at 11am Pacific Time. If that timezone works for you, you can find out more and register here.

Random Short Take #27

Welcome to my semi-regular, random news post in a short format. This is #27. You’d think it would be hard to keep naming them after basketball players, and it is. None of my favourite players ever wore 27, but Marvin Barnes did surface as a really interesting story, particularly when it comes to effective communication with colleagues. Happy holidays too, as I’m pretty sure this will be the last one of these posts I do this year. I’ll try and keep it short, as you’ve probably got stuff to do.

  • This story of serious failure on El Reg had me in stitches.
  • I really enjoyed this article by Raj Dutt (over at Cohesity’s blog) on recovery predictability. As an industry we talk an awful lot about speeds and feeds and supportability, but sometimes I think we forget about keeping it simple and making sure we can get our stuff back as we expect.
  • Speaking of data protection, I wrote some articles for Druva about, well, data protection and things of that nature. You can read them here.
  • There have been some pretty important CBT-related patches released by VMware recently. Anthony has provided a handy summary here.
  • Everything’s an opinion until people actually do it, but I thought this research on cloud adoption from Leaseweb USA was interesting. I didn’t expect to see everyone putting their hands up and saying they’re all in on public cloud, but I was also hopeful that we, as an industry, hadn’t made things as unclear as they seem to be. Yay, hybrid!
  • Site sponsor StorONE has partnered with Tech Data Global Computing Components to offer an All-Flash Array as a Service solution.
  • Backblaze has done a nice job of talking about data protection and cloud storage through the lens of Star Wars.
  • This tip on removing particular formatting in Microsoft Word documents really helped me out recently. Yes I know Word is awful.
  • Someone was nice enough to give me an acknowledgement for helping review a non-fiction book once. Now I’ve managed to get a character named after me in one of John Birmingham’s epics. You can read it out of context here. And if you’re into supporting good authors on Patreon – then check out JB’s page here. He’s a good egg, and his literary contributions to the world have been fantastic over the years. I don’t say this just because we live in the same city either.