Random Short Take #20

Here are some links to some random news items and other content that I recently found interesting. You might find them interesting too. Episode 20 – feels like it’s becoming a thing.

  • Scale Computing seems to be having a fair bit of success with their VDI solutions. Here’s a press release about what they did with Harlingen WaterWorks System.
  • I don’t read Corey Quinn’s articles enough, but I am glad I read this one. Regardless of what you think about the enforceability of non-compete agreements (and regardless of where you’re employed), these things have no place in the modern workforce.
  • If you’re getting along to VMworld US this year, I imagine there’s plenty in your schedule already. If you have the time – I recommend getting around to seeing what Cody and Pure Storage are up to. I find Cody to be a great presenter, and Pure have been doing some neat stuff lately.
  • Speaking of VMworld, this article from Tom about packing the little things for conferences in preparation for any eventuality was useful. And if you’re heading to VMworld, be sure to swing past the VMUG booth. There’s a bunch of VMUG stuff happening at VMworld – you can read more about that here.
  • I promise this is pretty much the last bit of news I’ll share regarding VMworld. Anthony from Veeam put up a post about their competition to win a pass to VMworld. If you’re on the fence about going, check it out now (as the competition closes on the 19th August).
  • It wouldn’t be a random short take without some mention of data protection. This article about tiering protection data from George Crump was bang on the money.
  • Backblaze published their quarterly roundup of hard drive stats – you can read more here.
  • This article from Paul on freelancing and side gigs was comprehensive and enlightening. If you’re thinking of taking on some extra work in the hopes of making it your full-time job, or just wanting to earn a little more pin money, it’s worthwhile reading this post.

Random Short Take #16

Here are a few links to some random news items and other content that I recently found interesting. You might find them interesting too. Episode 16 – please enjoy these semi-irregular updates.

  • Scale Computing has been doing a bit in the healthcare sector lately – you can read news about that here.
  • This was a nice roundup of the news from Apple’s recent WWDC from Six Colors. Hat tip to Stephen Foskett for the link. Speaking of WWDC news, you may have been wondering what happened to all of your purchased content with the imminent demise of iTunes on macOS. It’s still a little fuzzy, but this article attempts to shed some light on things. Spoiler: you should be okay (for the moment).
  • There’s a great post on the Dropbox Tech Blog from James Cowling discussing the mission versus the system.
  • The more things change, the more they remain the same. For years I had a Windows PC running Media Center and recording TV. I used IceTV as the XMLTV-based program guide provider. I then started to mess about with some HDHomeRun devices and the PC died and I went back to a traditional DVR arrangement. Plex now has DVR capabilities and it has been doing a reasonable job with guide data (and recording in general), but they’ve decided it’s all a bit too hard to curate guides and want users (at least in Australia) to use XMLTV-based guides instead. So I’m back to using IceTV with Plex. They’re offering a free trial at the moment for Plex users, and setup instructions are here. No, I don’t get paid if you click on the links.
  • Speaking of axe-throwing, the Cohesity team in Queensland is organising a social event for Friday 21st June from 2 – 4 pm at Maniax Axe Throwing in Newstead. You can get in contact with Casey if you’d like to register.
  • VeeamON Forum Australia is coming up soon. It will be held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Sydney on July 24th and should be a great event. You can find out more information and register for it here. The Vanguards are also planning something cool, so hopefully we’ll see you there.
  • Speaking of Veeam, Anthony Spiteri recently published his longest title in the Virtualization is Life! catalogue – Orchestration Of NSX By Terraform For Cloud Connect Replication With vCloud Director. It’s a great article, and worth checking out.
  • There’s a lot of talk and slideware devoted to digital transformation, and a lot of it is rubbish. But I found this article from Chin-Fah to be particularly insightful.

Random Short Take #15

Here are a few links to some random news items and other content that I recently found interesting. You might find them interesting too. Episode 15 – it could become a regular thing. Maybe every other week? Fortnightly even.

Veeam Basics – Configuring A Scale-Out Backup Repository

I’ve been doing some integration testing with Pure Storage and Veeam in the lab recently, and thought I’d write an article on configuring a scale-out backup repository (SOBR). To learn more about SOBR configurations, you can read the Veeam documentation here. This post from Rick Vanover also covers the what and the why of SOBR. In this example, I’m using a couple of FlashBlade-based NFS repositories that I’ve configured as per these instructions. Each NFS repository is mounted on a separate Linux virtual machine. I’m using a Windows-based Veeam Backup & Replication server running version 9.5 Update 4.

 

Process

Start by going to Backup Infrastructure -> Scale-out Repositories and click on Add Scale-out Repository.

Give it a name, maybe something snappy like “Scale-out Backup Repository 1”?

Click on Add to add the backup repositories.

When you click on Add, you’ll have the option to select the backup repositories you want to use. You can select them all, but for the purpose of this exercise, we won’t.

In this example, Backup Repository 1 and 2 are the NFS locations I configured previously. Select those two and click on OK.

You’ll now see the repositories listed as Extents.

Click on Advanced to check the advanced setttings are what you expect them to be. Click on OK.

Click Next to continue. You’ll see the following message.

You then choose the placement policy. It’s strongly recommended that you stick with Data locality as the placement policy.

You can also pick object storage to use as a Capacity Tier.

You’ll also have an option to configure the age of the files to be moved, and when they can be moved. And you might want to encrypt the data uploaded to your object storage environment, depending on where that object storage lives.

Once you’re happy, click on Apply. You’ll be presented with a summary of the configuration (and hopefully there won’t be any errors).

 

Thoughts

The SOBR feature, in my opinion, is pretty cool. I particularly like the ability to put extents in maintenance mode. And the option to use object storage as a capacity tier is a very useful feature. You get some granular control in terms of where you put your backup data, and what kind of performance you can throw at the environment. And as you can see, it’s not overly difficult to configure the environment. There are a few things to keep on mind though. Make sure your extents are stored on resilient hardware. If you keep your backup sets together with the data locality option, you’l be a sad panda if that extent goes bye bye. And the same goes for the performance option. You’ll also need Enterprise or Enterprise Plus editions of Veeam Backup & Replication for this feature to work. And you can’t use this feature for these types of jobs:

  • Configuration backup job;
  • Replication jobs (including replica seeding);
  • VM copy jobs; and
  • Veeam Agent backup jobs created by Veeam Agent for Microsoft Windows 1.5 or earlier and Veeam Agent for Linux 1.0 Update 1 or earlier.

There are any number of reasons why a scale-out backup repository can be a handy feature to use in your data protection environment. I’ve had the misfortune in the past of working with products that were difficult to manage from a data mobility perspective. Too many times I’ve been stuck going through all kinds of mental gymnastics working out how to migrate data sets from one storage platform to the next. With this it’s a simple matter of a few clicks and you’re on your way with a new bucket. The tiering to object feature is also useful, particularly if you need to keep backup sets around for compliance reasons. There’s no need to spend money on these living on performance disk if you can comfortably have them sitting on capacity storage after a period of time. And if you can control this movement through a policy-driven approach, then that’s even better. If you’re new to Veeam, it’s worth checking out a feature like this, particularly if you’re struggling with media migration challenges in your current environment. And if you’re an existing Enterprise or Enterprise Plus customer, this might be something you can take advantage of.

Using A Pure Storage FlashBlade As A Veeam Repository

I’ve been doing some testing in the lab recently. The focus of this testing has been primarily on Pure Storage’s ObjectEngine and its associated infrastructure. As part of that, I’ve been doing various things with Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 Update 4, including setting up a FlashBlade NFS repository. I’ve documented the process in a document here. One thing that I thought worthy of noting separately was the firewall requirements. For my Linux Mount Server, I used a CentOS 7 VM, configured with 8 vCPUs and 16GB of RAM. I know, I normally use Debian, but for some reason (that I didn’t have time to investigate) it kept dying every time I kicked off a backup job.

In any case, I set everything up as per Pure’s instructions, but kept getting timeout errors on the job. The error I got was “5/17/2019 10:03:47 AM :: Processing HOST-01 Error: A connection attempt failed because the connected party did not properly respond after a period of time, or established connection failed because connected host has failed to respond NFSMOUNTHOST:2500“. It felt like it was probably a firewall issue of some sort. I tried to make an exception on the Windows VM hosting the Veeam Backup server, but that didn’t help. The problem was with the Linux VM’s firewall. I used the instructions I found here to add in some custom rules. According to the Veeam documentation, Backup Repository access uses TCP ports 2500 – 5000. Your SecOps people will no doubt have a conniption, but here’s how to open those ports on CentOS.

Firstly, is the firewall running?

[danf@nfsmounthost ~]$ sudo firewall-cmd --state
[sudo] password for danf:
running

Yes it is. So let’s stop it to see if this line of troubleshooting is worth pursuing.

[danf@nfsmounthost ~]$ sudo systemctl stop firewalld

The backup job worked after that. Okay, so let’s start it up again and open up some ports to test.

[danf@nfsmounthost ~]$ sudo systemctl start firewalld
[danf@nfsmounthost ~]$ sudo firewall-cmd --add-port=2500-5000/tcp
success

That worked, so I wanted to make it a more permanent arrangement.

[danf@nfsmounthost ~]$ sudo firewall-cmd --permanent --add-port=2500-5000/tcp
success
[danf@nfsmounthost ~]$ sudo firewall-cmd --permanent --list-ports
2500-5000/tcp

Remember, it’s never the storage. It’s always the firewall. Also, keep in my mind this article is about the how. I’m not offering my opinion about whether it’s really a good idea to configure your host-based firewalls with more holes than Swiss cheese. Or whatever things have lots of holes in them.

Random Short Take #14

Here are a few links to some random news items and other content that I found interesting. You might find them interesting too. Episode 14 – giddy-up!

Random Short Take #13

Here are a few links to some random news items and other content that I found interesting. You might find them interesting too. Let’s dive in to lucky number 13.

Veeam Vanguard 2019

I was very pleased to get an email from Rick Vanover yesterday letting me know I was accepted as part of the Veeam Vanguard Program for 2019. This is my first time as part of this program, but I’m really looking forward to participating in it. Big shout out to Dilupa Ranatunga and Anthony Spiteri for nominating me in the first place, and for Rick and the team for having me as part of the program. Also, (and I’m getting a bit parochial here) special mention of the three other Queenslanders in the program (Rhys Hammond, Nathan Oldfield, and Chris Gecks). There’s going to be a lot of cool stuff happening with Veeam and in data protection generally this year and I can’t wait to get started. More soon.

Random Short Take #9

Here are a few links to some random news items and other content that I found interesting. You might find it interesting too. Maybe.

 

 

Random Short Take #8

Here are a few links to some news items and other content that might be useful. Maybe.