Random Short Take #39

Welcome to Random Short Take #39. Not a huge amount of players have worn 39 in the NBA, and I’m not going to pretend I’m any real fan of The Dwightmare. But things are tough all around, so let’s remain optimistic and push through to number 40. Anyway let’s get random.

  • VeeamON 2020 was online this week, and Anthony Spiteri has done a great job of summarising the major technical session announcements here.
  • I’ve known Howard Marks for a while now, and always relish the opportunity to speak with him when I can. This post is pretty hilarious, and I’m looking forward to reading the followup posts.
  • This is a great article from Alastair Cooke on COVID-19 and what En-Zed has done effectively to stop the spread. It was interesting to hear his thoughts on returning to the US, and I do agree that it’s going to be some time until I make the trip across the Pacific again.
  • Sometimes people get crazy ideas about how they might repurpose some old bits of technology. It’s even better when they write about their experiences in doing so. This article on automating an iPod Hi-Fi’s volume control over at Six Colors was fantastic.
  • Chris M. Evans put out a typically thought-provoking piece on data migration challenges recently that I think is worth checking out. I’ve been talking a lot to customers that are facing these challenges on a daily basis, and it’s interesting to see how, regardless of the industry vertical they operate in, it’s sometimes just a matter of the depth varying, so to speak.
  • I frequently bump into Ray Lucchesi at conferences, and he knows a fair bit about what does and doesn’t work. This article on his experiences recently with a number of virtual and online conferences is the epitome of constructive criticism.
  • Speaking of online conferences, the Australian VMUG UserCon will be virtual this year and will be held on the 30th July. You can find out more and register here.
  • Finally, if you’ve spent any time with me socially, you’ll know I’m a basketball nut. And invariably I’ll tell you that Deftones is may favouritest band ever. So it was great to come across this article about White Pony on one of my favourite sports (and popular culture) websites. If you’re a fan of Deftones, this is one to check out.

 

Datadobi Announces S3 Migration Capability

Datadobi recently announced S3 migration capabilities as part of DobiMigrate 5.9. I had the opportunity to speak to Carl D’Halluin and Michael Jack about the announcement and thought I’d share some thoughts on it here.

 

What Is It?

In short, you can now use DobiMigrate to perform S3 to S3 object storage migrations. It’s flexible too, offering the ability to migrate data from a variety of on-premises object systems up to public cloud object storage, between on-premises systems, or back to on-premises from public cloud storage. There’s support for a variety of S3 systems, including:

In the future Datadobi is looking to add support for AWS Glacier, object locks, object tags, and non-current object versions.

 

Why Would You?

There are quite a few reasons why you might want to move S3 data around. You could be seeing high egress charges from AWS because you’re accessing more data in S3 than you’d initially anticipated. You might be looking to move to the cloud and have a significant on-premises footprint that needs to go. Or you might be looking to replace your on-premises solution with a solution from another vendor.

 

How Would You?

The process used to migrate object is fairly straightforward, and follows a pattern that will be familiar if you’ve done anything with any kind of storage migration tool before. In short, you setup a migration pair (source and destination), run a scan and first copy, then do some incremental copies. Once you’ve got a maintenance window, there’s a cutover where the final scan and copy is done. And then you’re good to go. Basically.

[image courtesy of Datadobi]

 

Final Thoughts

Why am I so interested in these types of offerings? Part of it is that it reminds of all of the time I burnt through earlier in my career migrating data from various storage platforms to other storage platforms. One of the funny things about storage is that there’s rarely enough to service demand, and it rarely delivers the performance you need after it’s been in use for a few years. As such, there’s always some requirement to move data from one spot to another, and to keep that data intact in terms of its permissions, and metadata.

Amazon’s S3 offering has been amazing in terms of bringing object storage to the front of mind of many storage consumers who had previously only used block or file storage. Some of those users are now discovering that, while S3 is great, it can be expensive if you haven’t accounted for egress costs, or you’ve started using a whole lot more of it than initially anticipated. Some companies simply have to take their lumps, as everything is done in public cloud. But for those organisations with some on-premises footprint, the idea of being able to do performance oriented object storage in their own data centre holds a great deal of appeal. But how do you get it back on-premises in a reliable fashion? I believe that’s where Datadobi’s solution really shines.

I’m a fan of software that makes life easier for storage folk. Platform migrations can be a real pain to deal with, and are often riddled with risky propositions and daunting timeframes. Datadobi can’t necessarily change the laws of physics in a way that will keep your project manager happy, but it can do some stuff that means you won’t be quite as broken after a storage migration as you might have been previously. They already had a good story when it came to file storage migration, and the object to object story enhances it. Worth checking out.

Random Short Take #37

Welcome to Random Short Take #37. Not a huge amount of players have worn 37 in the NBA, but Metta World Peace did a few times. When he wasn’t wearing 15, and other odd numbers. But I digress. Let’s get random.

  • Pavilion Data recently added S3 capability to its platform. It’s based on a variant of MinIO, and adds an interesting dimension to what Pavilion Data has traditionally offered. Mellor provided some good coverage here.
  • Speaking of object storage, Dell EMC recently announced ECS 3.5. You can read more on that here. The architectural white paper has been updated to reflect the new version as well.
  • Speaking of Dell EMC, Preston posted a handy article on Data Domain Retention Lock and NetWorker. Have you pre-ordered Preston’s book yet? I’ll keep asking until you do.
  • Online events are all the rage at the moment, and two noteworthy events are coming up shortly: Pure//Accelerate and VeeamON 2020. Speaking of online events, we’re running a virtual BNEVMUG next week. Details on that here. ZertoCON Virtual is also a thing.
  • Speaking of Pure Storage, this article from Cody Hosterman on NVMe and vSphere 7 is lengthy, but definitely worth the read.
  • I can’t recall whether I mentioned that this white paper  covering VCD on VCF 3.9 is available now, and I can’t be bothered checking. So here it is.
  • I’m not just a fan of Backblaze because of its cool consumer backup solution and object storage platform, I’m also a big fan because of its blog. Articles like this one are a great example of companies doing corporate culture right (at least from what I can see).
  • I have the impression that Datadobi has been doing some cool stuff recently, and this story certainly seems to back it up.

Random Short Take #35

Welcome to Random Short Take #35. Some really good players have worn 35 in the NBA, including The Big Dog Antoine Carr, and Reggie Lewis. This one, though, goes out to one of my favourite players from the modern era, Kevin Durant. If it feels like it’s only been a week since the last post, that’s because it has. I bet you wish that I was producing some content that’s more useful than a bunch of links. So do I.

  • I don’t often get excited about funding rounds, but I have a friend who works there, so here’s an article covering the latest round (C) of funding for VAST Data.
  • Datadobi continue to share good news in these challenging times, and has published a success story based on some work it’s done with Payspan.
  • Speaking of challenging times, the nice folks a Retrospect are offering a free 90-day license subscription for Retrospect Backup. You don’t need a credit card to sign up, and “[a]ll backups can be restored, even if the subscription is cancelled”.
  • I loved this post from Russ discussing a recent article on Facebook and learning from network failures at scale. I’m in love with the idea that you can’t automate your way out of misconfiguration. We’ve been talking a lot about this in my day job lately. Automation can be a really exciting concept, but it’s not magic. And as scale increase, so too does the time it takes to troubleshoot issues. It all seems like a straightforward concept, but you’d be surprised how many people are surprised by these ideas.
  • Software continues to dominate the headlines, but hardware still has a role to play in the world. Alastair talks more about that idea here.
  • Paul Stringfellow recently jumped on the Storage Unpacked podcast to talk storage myths versus reality. Worth listening to.
  • It’s not all good news though. Sometimes people make mistakes, and pull out the wrong cables. This is a story I’ll be sharing with my team about resiliency.
  • SMR drives and consumer NAS devices aren’t necessarily the best combo. So this isn’t the best news either. I’m patiently waiting for consumer Flash drive prices to come down. It’s going to take a while though.

 

Datadobi Announces DobiMigrate 5.8 – Introduces Chain of Custody

Datadobi recently announced version 5.8 of its DobiMigrate software and introduced a “Chain of Custody” feature. I had the opportunity to speak to Carl D’Halluin and Michael Jack about the announcement and thought I’d share some thoughts on it here.

 

Don’t They Do File Migration?

If you’re unfamiliar with Datadobi, it’s a company that specialises in NAS migration software. It tends to get used a lot by the major NAS vendors as rock solid method of moving data of a competitor’s box and onto theirs. Datadobi has been around for quite a while, and a lot of the founders have heritage with EMC Centera.

Chain of Custody?

So what exactly does the Chain of Custody feature offer?

  • Tracking files and objects throughout an entire migration
  • Full photo-finish of source and destination system at cutover time
  • Forensic input which can serve as future evidence of tampering
  • Available for all migrations.
    • No performance hit.
    • No enlarged maintenance window.

[image courtesy of Datadobi]

Why Is This Important?

Organisations are subject to a variety of legislative requirements the word over to ensure that the data presented as evidence in courts of law hasn’t been tampered with. Some of them spend an inordinate amount of money ensuring that the document management systems (and the hardware those systems reside on) offer all kinds of compliance and governance features that ensure that you can reliably get up in front of a judge and say that nothing has been messed with. Or you can reliably say that it has been messed with. Either way though, it’s reliable. Unfortunately, nothing lasts forever (not even those Centera cubes we put in years ago).

So what do you do when you have to migrate your data from one platform to another? If you’ve just used rsync or robocopy to get the data from one share to another, how can you reliably prove that you’ve done so, without corrupting or otherwise tampering with the data? Logs are just files, after all, so what’s to stop someone “losing” some data. along the way?

It turns out that a lot of folks in the legal profession have been aware that this was a problem for a while, but they’ve looked the other way. I am no lawyer, but as it was explained to me, if you introduce some doubt into the reliability of the migration process, it’s easy enough for the other side to counter that your stuff may not have been so reliable either, and the whole thing becomes something of a shambles. Of course, there’s likely a more coherent way to explain this, but this is tech blog and I’m being lazy.

 

Thoughts

I’ve done all kinds of data migrations over the years. I think I’ve been fortunate that I’ve never specifically had to deal with a system that was being relied on seriously for legislative reasons, because I’m sure that some of those migrations were done more by the seat of my pants than anything else. Usually the last thing on the organisation’s mind (?) was whether the migration activity was compliant or not. Instead, the focus of the project manager was normally to get the data from the old box to the new box as quickly as possible and with as little drama / downtime as possible.

If you’re working on this stuff in a large financial institution though, you’ll likely have a different focus. And I’m sure the last thing your corporate counsel want to hear is that you’ve been playing a little fast and loose with data over the years. I anticipate this announcement will be greeted with some happiness by people who’ve been saddled with these kinds of daunting tasks in the past. As we move to a more and more digital world, we need to carry some of the concepts from the physical world across. It strikes me that Datadobi has every reason to be excited about this announcement. You can read the press release here.

 

Random Short Take #31

Welcome to Random Short Take #31. Lot of good players have worn 31 in the NBA. You’d think I’d call this the Reggie edition (and I appreciate him more after watching Winning Time), but this one belongs to Brent Barry. This may be related to some recency bias I have, based on the fact that Brent is a commentator in NBA 2K19, but I digress …

  • Late last year I wrote about Scale Computing’s big bet on a small form factor. Scale Computing recently announced that Jerry’s Foods is using the HE150 solution for in-store computing.
  • I find Plex to be a pretty rock solid application experience, and most of the problems I’ve had with it have been client-related. I recently had a problem with a server update that borked my installation though, and had to roll back. Here’s the quick and dirty way to do that on macOS.
  • Here’s are 7 contentious thoughts on data protection from Preston. I think there are some great ideas here and I recommend taking the time to read this article.
  • I recently had the chance to speak with Michael Jack from Datadobi about the company’s announcement about its new DIY Starter Pack for NAS migrations. Whilst it seems that the professional services market for NAS migrations has diminished over the last few years, there’s still plenty of data out there that needs to be moved from on box to another. Robocopy and rsync aren’t always the best option when you need to move this much data around.
  • There are a bunch of things that people need to learn to do operations well. A lot of them are learnt the hard way. This is a great list from Jan Schaumann.
  • Analyst firms are sometimes misunderstood. My friend Enrico Signoretti has been working at GigaOm for a little while now, and I really enjoyed this article on the thinking behind the GigaOm Radar.
  • Nexsan recently announced some enhancements to its “BEAST” storage platforms. You can read more on that here.
  • Alastair isn’t just a great writer and moustache aficionado, he’s also a trainer across a number of IT disciplines, including AWS. He recently posted this useful article on what AWS newcomers can expect when it comes to managing EC2 instances.