Random Short take #74

Welcome to Random Short Take #74. Let’s get random.

Random Short Take #73

Welcome to Random Short Take #73. Let’s get random.

QNAP – Expand Volume With Larger Drives

This is one of those articles I’ve been meaning to post for a while, simply because I forget every time I do it how to do it properly. One way to expand the capacity of your QNAP NAS (non-disruptively) is to replace the drives one at a time with larger capacity drives. It’s recommended that you follow this process, rather than just ripping the drives out one by one and waiting for the RAID Group to expand. It’s a simple enough process to follow, although the QNAP UI has always struck me as a little on the confusing side to navigate, so I took some pictures. Note that this was done on QNAP firmware 5.0.0.1986.

Firstly, go to Storage/Snapshots under Storage in the ControlPanel. Click on Manage.

Select the Storage Pool you want to expand, and click on Manage again.

This will give you a drop-down menu. Select Replace Disks One by One.

Now select the disk you want to replace and click on Change.

Once you’ve done this for all of the disks (and it will take some time to rebuild depending on a variety of factors), click on Expand Capacity. It will ask you if you’re sure and hopefully you’ll click OK.

It’ll take a while for the RAID Group to synchronise.

You’ll notice then that, while the Storage Pool has expanded, the Volume is still the original size. Select the Volume and click on Manage.

Now you can click on Resize Volume.

The Wizard will give you information on the Storage Pool capacity and give you the option to set the new capacity of the volume. I usually click on Set to Max.

It will warn you about that. Click on OK because you like to live on the edge.

It will take a little while, but eventually your Volume will have expanded to fill the space.

 

Random Short Take #72

This one is a little behind thanks to some work travel, but whatever. Let’s get random.

Datadobi Announces StorageMAP

Datadobi recently announced StorageMAP – a “solution that provides a single pane of glass for organizations to manage unstructured data across their complete data storage estate”. I recently had the opportunity to speak with Carl D’Halluin about the announcement, and thought I’d share some thoughts here.

 

The Problem

So what’s the problem enterprises are trying to solve? They have data all over the place, and it’s no longer a simple activity to work out what’s useful and what isn’t. Consider the data on a typical file / object server inside BigCompanyX.

[image courtesy of Datadobi]

As you can see, there’re all kinds of data lurking about the place, including data you don’t want to have on your server (e.g. Barry’s slightly shonky home videos), and data you don’t need any more (the stuff you can move down to a cheaper tier, or even archive for good).

What’s The Fix?

So how do you fix this problem? Traditionally, you’ll try and scan the data to understand things like capacity, categories of data, age, and so forth. You’ll then make some decisions about the data based on that information and take actions such as relocating, deleting, or migrating it. Sounds great, but it’s frequently a tough thing to make decisions about business data without understanding the business drivers behind the data.

[image courtesy of Datadobi]

What’s The Real Fix?

The real fix, according to Datadobi, is to add a bit more automation and smarts to the process, and this relies heavily on accurate tagging of the data you’re storing. D’Halluin pointed out to me that they don’t suggest you create complex tags for individual files, as you could be there for years trying to sort that out. Rather, you add tags to shares or directories, and let the StorageMAP engine make recommendations and move stuff around for you.

[image courtesy of Datadobi]

Tags can represent business ownership, the role of the data, any action to be taken, or other designations, and they’re user definable.
[image courtesy of Datadobi]

How Does This Fix It?

You’ll notice that the process above looks awfully similar to the one before – so how does this fix anything? The key, in my opinion at least, is that StorageMAP takes away the requirement for intervention from the end user. Instead of going through some process every quarter to “clean up the server”, you’ve got a process in place to do the work for you. As a result, you’ll hopefully see improved cost control, better storage efficiency across your estate, and (hopefully) you’ll be getting a little bit more value from your data.

 

Thoughts

Tools that take care of everything for you have always had massive appeal in the market, particularly as organisations continue to struggle with data storage at any kind of scale. Gone are the days when your admins had an idea where everything on a 9GB volume was stored, or why it was stored there. We now have data stored all over the place (both officially and unofficially), and it’s becoming impossible to keep track of it all.

The key things to consider with these kinds of solutions is that you need to put in the work with tagging your data correctly in the first place. So there needs to be some thought put into what your data looks like in terms of business value. Remember that mp4 video files might not be warranted in the Accounting department, but your friends in Marketing will be underwhelmed if you create some kind of rule to automatically zap mp4s. The other thing to consider is that you need to put some faith in the system. This kind of solution will be useless if folks insist on not deleting anything, or not “believing” the output of the analytics and reporting. I used to work with customers who didn’t want to trust a vendor’s automated block storage tiering because “what does it know about my workloads?”. Indeed. The success of these kind of intelligence and automation tools relies to a certain extent on folks moving away from faith-based computing as an operating model.

But enough ranting from me. I’ve covered Datadobi a bit over the last few years, and it makes sense that all of these announcements have finally led to the StorageMAP product. These guys know data, and how to move it.

StorCentric Announces Nexsan Unity NV10000

Nexsan (a StorCentric company) recently announced the Nexsan Unity NV10000. I thought I’d share a few of my thoughts here.

What Is It? 
In the immortal words of Silicon Valley: “It’s a box“. But the Nexsan Unity NV10000 is a box with some fairly decent specifications packed in a small form-factor, including support for various 1DWPD NVMe SSDs and the latest Intel Xeon processors.
Protocol Support
Protocol support, as would be expected with the Unity, is broad, with support for File (NFS, SMB), Block (iSCSI, FC), and Object (S3) data storage protocols within the one unified platform.
Performance Enhancements
These were hinted at with the release of Unity 7.0, but the Nexsan Unity NV10000 boosts performance by increasing bandwidths of up to 25GB/s, enabling you to scale performance up as your application needs evolve.

Other Useful Features

As you’d expect from this kind of storage array, the Nexsan Unity NV10000 also delivers features such as:

  • High availability (HA);
  • Snapshots;
  • ESXi integration;
  • In-line compression;
  • FASTier™ caching;
  • Asynchronous replication;
  • Data at rest encryption; and
  • Storage pool scrubbing to protect against bit rot, avoiding silent data corruption.

Backup Target?

Unity supports a comprehensive Host OS matrix and is certified as a Veeam Ready Repository for backups. Interestingly, the Nexsan Unity NV10000 also provides data security, regulations compliance, and ransomware recoverability. The platform also supports immutable block and file and S3 object locking, for data backup that is unchangeable and cannot be encrypted, even by internal bad actors.

Thoughts

I’m not as much of a diskslinger as I used to be, but I’m always interested to hear about what StorCentric / Nexsan has been up to with its storage array releases. It strikes me that the company does well by focussing on those features that customers are looking for (fast storage, peace of mind, multiple protocols) and also by being able to put it in a form-factor that appeals in terms of storage density. While the ecosystem around StorCentric is extensive, it makes sense for the most part, with the various components coming together well to form a decent story. I like that the company has really focussed on ensuring that Unity isn’t just a cool product name, but also a key part of the operating environment that powers the solution.

Random Short Take #70

Welcome to Random Short Take #70. Let’s get random.

Random Short Take #68

Welcome to Random Short Take #68. Let’s get random.

Random Short Take #67

Welcome to Random Short Take #67. Let’s get random.

  • MinIO was in the news recently, and this article from Chin-Fah seems to summarise nicely what you need to know.
  • Whenever I read articles about home Internet connectivity, I generally chuckle in Australian and move on. But this article from Jeff Geerling on his experience with Starlink makes for interesting reading, if only for the somewhat salty comments people felt the need to leave after the article was published. He nonetheless brings up some great points about challenges with the service, and I think the endless fawning over Musk as some kind of tech saviour needs to stop.
  • In the “just because you can, doesn’t mean you should” category is this article from William Lam, outlining how to create a VMFS datastore on a USB device. It’s unsupported, but it strikes me that this is just the kind of crazy thing that might be useful to folks trying to move around VMs at the edge.
  • Karen Lopez is a really smart person, and this article over at Gestalt IT is more than just the “data is the new oil” schtick we’ve been hearing for the past few years.
  • Speaking of Pure Storage, Kyndryl and Pure Storage have announced a global alliance. You can read more on that here.
  • Mike Preston wrote a brief explainer on S3 Object Lock here. I really enjoy Mike’s articles, as I find he has a knack for breaking down complex topics into very simple to digest and consume pieces.
  • Remember when the movies and TV shows you watched had consistent aspect ratios? This article from Tom Andry talks about how that’s changed quite a bit in the last few years.
  • I’m still pretty fresh in my role, but in the future I hope to be sharing more news and articles about VMware Cloud on AWS. In the meantime, check out this article from Greg Vinton, where he covers some of his favourite parts of what’s new in the platform.

In unrelated news, this is the last week to vote for the #ITBlogAwards. You can cast your vote here.

Random Short Take #65

Welcome to Random Short take #65. Last one for the year I think.

  • First up, this handy article from Steve Onofaro on replacing certificates in VMware Cloud Director 10.3.1.
  • Speaking of cloud, I enjoyed this article from Chris M. Evans on the AWS “wobble” (as he puts it) in us-east-1 recently. Speaking of articles Chris has written recently, check out his coverage of the Pure Storage FlashArray//XL announcement.
  • Speaking of Pure Storage, my friend Jon wrote about his experience with ActiveCluster in the field recently. You can find that here. I always find these articles to be invaluable, if only because they demonstrate what’s happening out there in the real world.
  • Want some press releases? Here’s one from Datadobi announcing it has released new Starter Packs for DobiMigrate ranging from 1PB up to 7PB.
  • Data protection isn’t just something you do at the office – it’s a problem for home too. I’m always interested to hear how other people tackle the problem. This article from Jeff Geerling (and the associated documentation on Github) was great.
  • John Nicholson is a smart guy, so I think you should check out his articles on benchmarking (and what folks are getting wrong). At the moment this is a 2-part series, but I suspect that could be expanded. You can find Part 1 here and Part 2 here. He makes a great point that benchmarking can be valuable, but benchmarking like it’s 1999 may not be the best thing to do (I’m paraphrasing).
  • Speaking of smart people, Tom Andry put together a great article recently on dispelling myths around subwoofers. If you or a loved one are getting worked up about subwoofers, check out this article.
  • I had people ask me if I was doing a predictions post this year. I’m not crazy enough to do that, but Mellor is. You can read his article here.

In some personal news (and it’s not LinkedIn official yet) I recently quit my job and will be taking up a new role in the new year. I’m not shutting the blog down, but you might see a bit of a change in the content. I can’t see myself stopping these articles, but it’s likely there’ll be less of the data protection howto articles being published. But we’ll see. In any case, wherever you are, stay safe, happy holidays, and see you on the line next year.