Komprise Continues To Gain Momentum

I first encountered Komprise at Storage Field Day 17, and was impressed by the offering. I recently had the opportunity to take a briefing with Krishna Subramanian, President and COO at Komprise, and thought I’d share some of my notes here.

 

Momentum

Funding

The primary reason for our call was to discuss Komprise’s Series C funding round of US $24 million. You can read the press release here. Some noteworthy achievements include:

  • Revenue more than doubled every single quarter, with existing customers steadily growing how much they manage with Komprise; and
  • Some customers now managing hundreds of PB with Komprise.

 

Key Verticals

Komprise are currently operating in the following key verticals:

  • Genomics and health care, with rapidly growing footprints;
  • Financial and Insurance sectors (5 out of 10 of the largest insurance companies in the world apparently use Komprise);
  • A lot of universities (research-heavy environments); and
  • Media and entertainment.

 

What’s It Do Again?

Komprise manages unstructured data over three key protocols (NFS, SMB, S3). You can read more about the product itself here, but some of the key features include the ability to “Transparently archive data”, as well as being able to put a copy of your data in another location (the cloud, for example).

 

So What’s New?

One of Komprise’s recent announcements was NAS to NAS migration.  Say, for example, you’d like to migrate your data from an Isilon environment to FlashBlade, all you have to do is set one as a source, and one as target. The ACLs are fully preserved across all scenarios, and Komprise does all the heavy lifting in the background.

They’re also working on what they call “Deep Analytics”. Komprise already aggregates file analytics data very efficiently. They’re now working on indexing metadata on files and exposing that index. This will give you “a Google-like search on all your data, no matter where it sits”. The idea is that you can find data using any combination of metadata. The feature is in beta right now, and part of the new funding is being used to expand and grow this capability.

 

Other Things?

Komprise can be driven entirely from an API, making it potentially interesting for service providers and VARs wanting to add support for unstructured data and associated offerings to their solutions. You can also use Komprise to “confine” data. The idea behind this is that data can be quarantined (if you’re not sure it’s being used by any applications). Using this feature you can perform staged deletions of data once you understand what applications are using what data (and when).

 

Thoughts

I don’t often write articles about companies getting additional funding. I’m always very happy when they do, as someone thinks they’re on the right track, and it means that people will continue to stay employed. I thought this was interesting enough news to cover though, given that unstructured data, and its growth and management challenges, is an area I’m interested in.

When I first wrote about Komprise I joked that I needed something like this for my garage. I think it’s still a valid assertion in a way. The enterprise, at least in the unstructured file space, is a mess based on the what I’ve seen in the wild. Users and administrators continue to struggle with the sheer volume and size of the data they have under their management. Tools such as this can provide valuable insights into what data is being used in your organisation, and, perhaps more importantly, who is using it. My favourite part is that you can actually do something with this knowledge, using Komprise to copy, migrate, or archive old (and new) data to other locations to potentially reduce the load on your primary storage.

I bang on all the time about the importance of archiving solutions in the enterprise, particularly when companies have petabytes of data under their purview. Yet, for reasons that I can’t fully comprehend, a number of enterprises continue to ignore the problem they have with data hoarding, instead opting to fill their DCs and cloud storage with old data that they don’t use (and very likely don’t need to store). Some of this is due to the fact that some of the traditional archive solution vendors have moved on to other focus areas. And some of it is likely due to the fact that archiving can be complicated if you can’t get the business to agree to stick to their own policies for document management. In just the same way as you can safely delete certain financial information after an amount of time has elapsed, so too can you do this with your corporate data. Or, at the very least, you can choose to store it on infrastructure that doesn’t cost a premium to maintain. I’m not saying “Go to work and delete old stuff”. But, you know, think about what you’re doing with all of that stuff. And if there’s no value in keeping the “kitchen cleaning roster May 2012.xls” file any more, think about deleting it? Or, consider a solution like Komprise to help you make some of those tough decisions.

VMware vSphere and NFS – Some Links

Most of my experience with vSphere storage has revolved around various block storage technologies, such as DAS, FC and iSCSI. I recently began an evaluation of one of those fresh new storage startups running an NVMe-based system. We didn’t have the infrastructure to support NVMe-oF in our lab, so we’ve used NFS to connect the datastores to our vSphere environment. Obviously, at this point, it is less about maximum performance and more about basic functionality. In any case, I thought it might be useful to include a series of links regarding NFS and vSphere that I’ve been using to both get up and running, and troubleshoot some minor issues we had getting everything running. Note that most of these links cover vSphere 6.5, as our lab is currently running that version.

Basics

Create an NFS Datastore

How to add NFS export to VMware ESXi 6.5

NFS Protocols and ESXi

Best Practice

Best Practices for running VMware vSphere on Network Attached Storage

Troubleshooting

Maximum supported volumes reached (1020652)

Increasing the default value that defines the maximum number of NFS mounts on an ESXi/ESX host (2239)

Troubleshooting connectivity issues to an NFS datastore on ESX and ESXi hosts (1003967)

Random Short Take #11

Here are a few links to some random news items and other content that I found interesting. You might find it interesting too. Maybe. Happy New Year too. I hope everyone’s feeling fresh and ready to tackle 2019.

  • I’m catching up with the good folks from Scale Computing in the next little while, but in the meantime, here’s what they got up to last year.
  • I’m a fan of the fruit company nowadays, but if I had to build a PC, this would be it (hat tip to Stephen Foskett for the link).
  • QNAP announced the TR-004 over the weekend and I had one delivered on Tuesday. It’s unusual that I have cutting edge consumer hardware in my house, so I’ll be interested to see how it goes.
  • It’s not too late to register for Cohesity’s upcoming Helios webinar. I’m looking forward to running through some demos with Jon Hildebrand and talking about how Helios helps me manage my Cohesity environment on a daily basis.
  • Chris Evans has published NVMe in the Data Centre 2.0 and I recommend checking it out.
  • I went through a basketball card phase in my teens. This article sums up my somewhat confused feelings about the card market (or lack thereof).
  • Elastifile Cloud File System is now available on the AWS Marketplace – you can read more about that here.
  • WekaIO have posted some impressive numbers over at spec.org if you’re into that kind of thing.
  • Applications are still open for vExpert 2019. If you haven’t already applied, I recommend it. The program is invaluable in terms of vendor and community engagement.

 

 

Storage Field Day – I’ll Be At Storage Field Day 18

Here’s some good news for you. I’ll be heading to the US in late February for another Storage Field Day event. If you haven’t heard of the very excellent Tech Field Day events, you should check them out. I’m looking forward to time travel and spending time with some really smart people for a few days. It’s also worth checking back on the Storage Field Day 18 website during the event (February 27 – March 1) as there’ll be video streaming and updated links to additional content. You can also see the list of delegates and event-related articles that have been published.

I think it’s a great line-up of both delegates and presenting companies (including a “secret company”) this time around. I know them all pretty well, but there may also still be a few companies added to the line-up. I’ll update this if and when they’re announced.

I’d like to publicly thank in advance the nice folks from Tech Field Day who’ve seen fit to have me back, as well as my employer for letting me take time off to attend these events. Also big thanks to the companies presenting. It’s going to be a lot of fun. Seriously. If you’re in the Bay Area and want to catch up prior to the event, please get in touch. I’ll have some free time, so perhaps we could check out a Warriors game on the 23rd and discuss the state of the industry? ;)

OpenMediaVault – Good Times With mdadm

Happy 2019. I’ve been on holidays for three full weeks and it was amazing. I’ll get back to writing about boring stuff soon, but I thought I’d post a quick summary of some issues I’ve had with my home-built NAS recently and what I did to fix it.

Where Are The Disks Gone?

I got an email one evening with the following message.

I do enjoy the “Faithfully yours, etc” and the post script is the most enlightening bit. See where it says [UU____UU]? Yeah, that’s not good. There are 8 disks that make up that device (/dev/md0), so it should look more like [UUUUUUUU]. But why would 4 out of 8 disks just up and disappear? I thought it was a little odd myself. I had a look at the ITX board everything was attached to and realised that those 4 drives were plugged in to a PCI SATA-II card. It seems that either the slot on the board or the card are now failing intermittently. I say “seems” because that’s all I can think of, as the S.M.A.R.T. status of the drives is fine.

Resolution, Baby

The short-term fix to get the filesystem back on line and useable was the classic “assemble” switch with mdadm. Long time readers of this blog may have witnessed me doing something similar with my QNAP devices from time to time. After panic rebooting the box a number of times (a silly thing to do, really), it finally responded to pings. Checking out /proc/mdstat wasn’t good though.

dan@openmediavault:~$ cat /proc/mdstat
Personalities : [raid6] [raid5] [raid4]
unused devices: <none>

Notice the lack of, erm, devices there? That’s non-optimal. The fix requires a forced assembly of the devices comprising /dev/md0.

dan@openmediavault:~$ sudo mdadm --assemble --force --verbose /dev/md0 /dev/sd[abcdefhi]
[sudo] password for dan:
mdadm: looking for devices for /dev/md0
mdadm: /dev/sda is identified as a member of /dev/md0, slot 0.
mdadm: /dev/sdb is identified as a member of /dev/md0, slot 1.
mdadm: /dev/sdc is identified as a member of /dev/md0, slot 3.
mdadm: /dev/sdd is identified as a member of /dev/md0, slot 2.
mdadm: /dev/sde is identified as a member of /dev/md0, slot 5.
mdadm: /dev/sdf is identified as a member of /dev/md0, slot 4.
mdadm: /dev/sdh is identified as a member of /dev/md0, slot 7.
mdadm: /dev/sdi is identified as a member of /dev/md0, slot 6.
mdadm: forcing event count in /dev/sdd(2) from 40639 upto 40647
mdadm: forcing event count in /dev/sdc(3) from 40639 upto 40647
mdadm: forcing event count in /dev/sdf(4) from 40639 upto 40647
mdadm: forcing event count in /dev/sde(5) from 40639 upto 40647
mdadm: clearing FAULTY flag for device 3 in /dev/md0 for /dev/sdd
mdadm: clearing FAULTY flag for device 2 in /dev/md0 for /dev/sdc
mdadm: clearing FAULTY flag for device 5 in /dev/md0 for /dev/sdf
mdadm: clearing FAULTY flag for device 4 in /dev/md0 for /dev/sde
mdadm: Marking array /dev/md0 as 'clean'
mdadm: added /dev/sdb to /dev/md0 as 1
mdadm: added /dev/sdd to /dev/md0 as 2
mdadm: added /dev/sdc to /dev/md0 as 3
mdadm: added /dev/sdf to /dev/md0 as 4
mdadm: added /dev/sde to /dev/md0 as 5
mdadm: added /dev/sdi to /dev/md0 as 6
mdadm: added /dev/sdh to /dev/md0 as 7
mdadm: added /dev/sda to /dev/md0 as 0
mdadm: /dev/md0 has been started with 8 drives.

In this example you’ll see that /dev/sdg isn’t included in my command. That device is the SSD I use to boot the system. Sometimes Linux device conventions confuse me too. If you’re in this situation and you think this is just a one-off thing, then you should be okay to unmount the filesystem, run fsck over it, and re-mount it. In my case, this has happened twice already, so I’m in the process of moving data off the NAS onto some scratch space and have procured a cheap little QNAP box to fill its role.

 

Conclusion

My rush to replace the homebrew device with a QNAP isn’t a knock on the OpenMediaVault project by any stretch. OMV itself has been very reliable and has done everything I needed it to do. Rather, my ability to build semi-resilient devices on a budget has simply proven quite poor. I’ve seen some nasty stuff happen with QNAP devices too, but at least any issues will be covered by some kind of manufacturer’s support team and warranty. My NAS is only covered by me, and I’m just not that interested in working out what could be going wrong here. If I’d built something decent I’d get some alerting back from the box telling me what’s happened to the card that keeps failing. But then I would have spent a lot more on this box than I would have wanted to.

I’ve been lucky thus far in that I haven’t lost any data of real import (the NAS devices are used to store media that I have on DVD or Blu-Ray – the important documents are backed up using Time Machine and Backblaze). It is nice, however, that a tool like mdadm can bring you back from the brink of disaster in a pretty efficient fashion.

Incidentally, if you’re a macOS user, you might have a bunch of .ds_store files on your filesystem. Or stuff like .@Thumb or some such. These things are fine, but macOS doesn’t seem to like them when you’re trying to move folders around. This post provides some handy guidance on how to get rid of a those files in a jiffy.

As always, if the data you’re storing on your NAS device (be it home-built or off the shelf) is important, please make sure you back it up. Preferably in a number of places. Don’t get yourself in a position where this blog post is your only hope of getting your one copy of your firstborn’s pictures from the first day of school back.

Elastifile Announces Cloud File Service

Elastifile recently announced a partnership with Google to deliver a fully-managed file service delivered via the Google Cloud Platform. I had the opportunity to speak with Jerome McFarland and Dr Allon Cohen about the announcement and thought I’d share some thoughts here.

 

What Is It?

Elastifile Cloud File Service delivers a self-service SaaS experience, providing the ability to consume scalable file storage that’s deeply integrated with Google infrastructure. You could think of it as similar to Amazon’s EFS.

[image courtesy of Elastifile]

 

Benefits

Easy to Use

Why would you want to use this service? It:

  • Eliminates manual infrastructure management;
  • Provisions turnkey file storage capacity in minutes; and
  • Can be delivered in any zone, and any region.

 

Elastic

It’s also cloudy in a lot of the right ways you want things to be cloudy, including:

  • Pay-as-you-go, consumption-based pricing;
  • Flexible pricing tiers to match workflow requirements; and
  • The ability to start small and scale out or in as needed and on-demand.

 

Google Native

One of the real benefits of this kind of solution though, is the deep integration with Google’s Cloud Platform.

  • The UI, deployment, monitoring, and billing are fully integrated;
  • You get a single bill from Google; and
  • The solution has been co-engineered to be GCP-native.

[image courtesy of Elastifile]

 

What About Cloud Filestore?

With Google’s recently announced Cloud Filestore, you get:

  • A single storage tier selection, being Standard or SSD;
  • It’s available in-cloud only; and
  • Grow capacity or performance up to a tier capacity.

With Elastifile’s Cloud File Service, you get access to the following features:

  • Aggregates performance & capacity of many VMs
  • Elastically scale-out or -in; on-demand
  • Multiple service tiers for cost flexibility
  • Hybrid cloud, multi-zone / region and cross-cloud support

You can also use ClearTier to perform tiering between file and object without any application modification.

 

Thoughts

I’ve been a fan of Elastifile for a little while now, and I thought their 3.0 release had a fair bit going for it. As you can see from the list of features above, Elastifile are really quite good at leveraging all of the cool things about cloud – it’s software only (someone else’s infrastructure), reasonably priced, flexible, and scalable. It’s a nice change from some vendors who have focussed on being in the cloud without necessarily delivering the flexibility that cloud solutions have promised for so long. Coupled with a robust managed service and some preferential treatment from Google and you’ve got a compelling solution.

Not everyone will want or need a managed service to go with their file storage requirements, but if you’re an existing GCP and / or Elastifile customer, this will make some sense from a technical assurance perspective. The ability to take advantage of features such as ClearTier, combined with the simplicity of keeping it all under the Google umbrella, has a lot of appeal. Elastifile are in the box seat now as far as these kinds of offerings are concerned, and I’m keen to see how the market responds to the solution. If you’re interested in this kind of thing, the Early Access Program opens December 11th with general availability in Q1 2019. In the meantime, if you’d like to try out ECFS on GCP – you can sign up here.

Random Short Take #9

Here are a few links to some random news items and other content that I found interesting. You might find it interesting too. Maybe.

 

 

Pure Storage Goes All In On Hybrid … Cloud

I recently had the opportunity to hear from Chadd Kenney about Pure Storage’s Cloud Data Services announcement and thought it worthwhile covering here. But before I get into that, Pure have done a little re-branding recently. You’ll now hear them referring to Cloud Data Infrastructure (their on-premises instances of FlashArray, FlashBlade, FlashStack) and Cloud Data Management (being their Pure1 instances).

 

The Announcement

So what is “Cloud Data Services”? It’s comprised of:

According to Kenney, “[t]he right strategy is and not or, but the enterprise is not very cloudy, and the cloud is not very enterprise-y”. If you’ve spent time in any IT organisation, you’ll see that there is, indeed, a “Cloud divide” in play. What we’ve seen in the last 5 – 10 years is a marked difference in application architectures, consumption and management, and even storage offerings.

[image courtesy of Pure Storage]

 

Cloud Block Store

The first part of the puzzle is probably the most interesting for those of us struggling to move traditional application stacks to a public cloud solution.

[image courtesy of Pure Storage]

According to Pure, Cloud Block Store offers:

  • High reliability, efficiency, and performance;
  • Hybrid mobility and protection; and
  • Seamless APIs on-premises and cloud.

Kenney likens building a Purity solution on AWS to the approach Pure took in the early days of their existence, when they took off the shelf components and used optimised software to make them enterprise-ready. Now they’re doing the same thing with AWS, and addressing a number of the shortcomings of the underlying infrastructure through the application of the Purity architecture.

Features

So why would you want to run virtual Pure controllers on AWS? The idea is that Cloud Block Store:

  • Aggregates performance and reliability across many cloud stores;
  • Can be deployed HA across two availability zones (using active cluster);
  • Is always thin, deduplicated, and compressed;
  • Delivers instant space-saving snapshots; and
  • Is always encrypted.

Management and Orchestration

If you have previous experience with Purity, you’ll appreciate the management and orchestration experience remains the same.

  • Same management, with Pure1 managing on-premises instances and instances in the cloud
  • Consistent APIs on-premises and in cloud
  • Plugins to AWS and VMware automation
  • Open, full-stack orchestration

Use Cases

Pure say that you can use this kind of solution in a number of different scenarios, including DR, backup, and migration in and between clouds. If you want to use ActiveCluster between AWS regions, you might have some trouble with latency, but in those cases other replication options are available.

[image courtesy of Pure Storage]

Not that Cloud Block Store is available in a few different deployment configurations:

  • Test/Dev – using a single controller instance (EBS can’t be attached to more than one EC2 instance)
  • Production – ActiveCluster (2 controllers, either within or across availability zones)

 

CloudSnap

Pure tell us that we’ve moved away from “disk to disk to tape” as a data protection philosophy and we now should be looking at “Flash to Flash to Cloud”. CloudSnap allows FlashArray snapshots to be easily sent to Amazon S3. Note that you don’t necessarily need FlashBlade in your environment to make this work.

[image courtesy of Pure Storage]

For the moment, this only being certified on AWS.

 

StorReduce for AWS

Pure acquired StorReduce a few months ago and now they’re doing something with it. If you’re not familiar with them, “StorReduce is an object storage deduplication engine, designed to enable simple backup, rapid recovery, cost-effective retention, and powerful data re-use in the Amazon cloud”. You can leverage any array, or existing backup software – it doesn’t need to be a Pure FlashArray.

Features

According to Pure, you get a lot of benefits with StorReduce, including:

  • Object fabric – secure, enterprise ready, highly durable cloud object storage;
  • Efficient – Reduces storage and bandwidth costs by up to 97%, enabling cloud storage to cost-effectively replace disk & tape;
  • Fast – Fastest Deduplication engine on the market. 10s of GiB/s or more sustained 24/7;
  • Cloud Native – Native S3 interface enabling openness, integration, and data portability. All Data & Metadata stored in object store;
  • Single namespace – Stores in a single data hub across your data centre to enable fast local performance and global data protection; and
  • Scalability – Software nodes scale linearly to deliver 100s of PBs and 10s of GBs bandwidth.

 

Thoughts and Further Reading

The title of this post was a little misleading, as Pure have been doing various cloud things for some time. But sometimes I give in to my baser instincts and like to try and be creative. It’s fine. In my mind the Cloud Block Store for AWS piece of the Cloud Data Services announcement is possibly the most interesting one. It seems like a lot of companies are announcing these kinds of virtualised versions of their hardware-based appliances that can run on public cloud infrastructure. Some of them are just encapsulated instances of the original code, modified to deal with a VM-like environment, whilst others take better advantage of the public cloud architecture.

So why are so many of the “traditional” vendors producing these kinds of solutions? Well, the folks at AWS are pretty smart, but it’s a generally well understood fact that the enterprise moves at enterprise pace. To that end, they may not be terribly well positioned to spend a lot of time and effort to refactor their applications to a more cloud-friendly architecture. But that doesn’t mean that the CxOs haven’t already been convinced that they don’t need their own infrastructure anymore. So the operations folks are being pushed to migrate out of their DCs and into public cloud provider infrastructure. The problem is that, if you’ve spent a few minutes looking at what the likes of AWS and GCP offer, you’ll see that they’re not really doing things in the same way that their on-premises comrades are. AWS expects you to replicate your data at an application level, for example, because those EC2 instances will sometimes just up and disappear.

So how do you get around the problem of forcing workloads into public cloud without a lot of the safeguards associated with on-premises deployments? You leverage something like Pure’s Cloud Block Store. It overcomes a lot of the issues associated with just running EC2 on EBS, and has the additional benefit of giving your operations folks a consistent management and orchestration experience. Additionally, you can still do things like run ActiveCluster between and within Availability Zones, so your mission critical internal kitchen roster application can stay up and running when an EC2 instance goes bye bye. You’ll pay a bit less or more than you would with normal EBS, but you’ll get some other features too.

I’ve argued before that if enterprises are really serious about getting into public cloud, they should be looking to work towards refactoring their applications. But I also understand that the reality of enterprise application development means that this type of approach is not always possible. After all, enterprises are (generally) in the business of making money. If you come to them and can’t show exactly how they’ save money by moving to public cloud (and let’s face it, it’s not always an easy argument), then you’ll find it even harder to convince them to undertake significant software engineering efforts simply because the public cloud folks like to do things a certain way. I’m rambling a bit, but my point is that these types of solutions solve a problem that we all wish didn’t exist but it does.

Justin did a great write-up here that I recommend reading. Note that both Cloud Block Store and StorReduce are in Beta with planned general availability in 2019.

OT – I Voted. Now It’s Over To You

Eric Siebert has opened up voting for the Top vBlog 2018. I’m listed on the vLaunchpad and you can vote for me under storage and independent blog categories as well. There are a bunch of great blogs listed on Eric’s vLaunchpad, so if nothing else you may discover someone you haven’t heard of before, and chances are they’ll have something to say that’s worth checking out. If this stuff seems a bit needy, it is. But it’s also nice to have people actually acknowledging what you’re doing. I’m hoping that people find this blog useful, because it really is a labour of love (random vendor t-shirts notwithstanding).

NVMesh 2 – A Compelling Sequel From Excelero

The Announcement

Excelero recently announced NVMesh 2 – the next iteration of their NVMesh product. NVMesh is a software-only solution designed to pool NVMe-based PCIe SSDs.

[image courtesy of Excelero]

Key Features

There are three key features that have been added to NVMesh.

  • MeshConnect – adding support for traditional network technologies TCP/IP and Fibre Channel, giving NVMesh the widest selection of supported protocols and fabrics of software-defined storage platforms along with already supported InfiniBand, RoCE v2, RDMA and NVMe-oF.
  • MeshProtect – offering flexible protection levels for differing application needs, including mirrored and parity-based redundancy.
  • MeshInspect – with performance analytics for pinpointing anomalies quickly and at scale.

Performance

Excelero have said that NVMesh delivers “shared NVMe at local performance and 90+% storage efficiency that helps further drive down the cost per GB”.

Protection

There’s also a range of protection options available now. Excelero tell me that you can start at level 0 (no protection, lowest latency) all the way to “MeshProtect 10+2 (distributed dual parity)”. This allows customers to “choose their preferred level of performance and protection. [While] Distributing data redundancy services eliminates the storage controller bottleneck.”

Visibility

One of my favourite things about NVMesh 2 is the MeshInspect feature, with a “built-in statistical collection and display, stored in a scalable NoSQL database”.

[image courtesy of Excelero]

 

Thoughts And Further Reading

Excelero emerged form stealth mode at Storage Field Day 12. I was impressed with their offering back then, and they continue to add features while focussing on delivering top notch performance via a software-only solution. It feels like there’s a lot of attention on NVMe-based storage solutions, and with good reason. These things can go really, really fast. There are a bunch of startups with an NVMe story, and the bigger players are all delivering variations on these solutions as well.

Excelero seem well placed to capitalise on this market interest, and their decision to focus on a software-only play seems wise, particularly given that some of the standards, such as NVMe over TCP, haven’t been fully ratified yet. This approach will also appeal to the aspirational hyperscalers, because they can build their own storage solution, source their own devices, and still benefit from a fast software stack that can deliver performance in spades. Excelero also supports a wide range of transports now, with the addition of NVMe over FC and TCP support.

NVMesh 2 looks to be smoothing some of the rougher edges that were present with version 1, and I’m pumped to see the focus on enhanced visibility via MeshInspect. In my opinion these kinds of tools are critical to the uptake of solutions such as NVMesh in both the enterprise and cloud markets. The broadening of the connectivity story, as well as the enhanced resiliency options, make this something worth investigating. If you’d like to read more, you can access a white paper here (registration required).