Aparavi Comes Out Of Stealth. Dazzles.

Santa Monica-based (I love that place) SaaS data protection outfit, Aparavi, recently came out of stealth, and I thought it was worthwhile covering their initial offering.

 

So Latin Then?

What’s an Aparavi? It’s apparently Latin and means “[t]o prepare, make ready, and equip”. The way we consume infrastructure has changed, but a lot of data protection products haven’t changed to accommodate this. Aparavi are keen to change that, and tell me that their product is “designed to work seamlessly alongside your business continuity plan to ease the burden of compliance and data protection for mid market companies”. Sounds pretty neat, so how does it work?

 

Architecture

Aparavi uses a three tiered architecture written in Node.js and C++. It consists of:

  • The Aparavi hosted platform;
  • An on-premises software appliance; and
  • A source client.

[image courtesy of Aparavi]

The platform is available as a separate module if required, otherwise it’s hosted on Aparavi’s infrastructure. The software appliance is the relationship manager in the solution. It performs in-line deduplication and compression. The source client can be used as a temporary recovery location if required. AES-256 encryption is done at the source, and the metadata is also encrypted. Key storage is all handled via keyring-style encryption mechanisms. There is communication between the web platform and the appliance, but the appliance can operate when the platform is off-line if required.

 

Cool Features

There are a number of cool features of the Aparavi solution, including:

  • Patented point-in-time recovery – you can recover data from any combination of local and cloud storage (you don’t need the backup set to live in one place);
  • Cloud active data pruning – will automatically remove files, and portions of files no longer needed from cloud locations;
  • Multi-cloud agile retention (this is my favourite) – you can use multiple cloud locations without the need to move data from one to the other;
  • Open data format – open source published, with Aparavi providing a reader so data can be read by any tool; and
  • Multi-tier, multi-tenancy – Aparavi are very focused on delivering a multi-tier and multi-tenant environment for service providers and folks who like to scale.

 

Retention Simplified

  • Policy Engine – uses file exclusion and inclusion lists
  • Comprehensive Search – search by user name and appliance name as well as file name
  • Storage Analytics – how much you’re saving by pruning, data growth / shrinkage over time, % change monitor
  • Auditing and Reporting Tools
  • RESTful API – anything in the UI can be automated

 

What Does It Run On?

Aparavi runs on all Microsoft-supported Windows platforms as well as most major Linux distributions (including Ubuntu and RedHat). They use the Amazon S3 API, and support GCP and are working on OpenStack and Azure. They’ve also got some good working relationships with Cloudian and Scality, amongst others.

[image courtesy of Aparavi]

 

Availability?

Aparavi are having a “soft launch” on October 25th. The product is licensed on the amount of source data protected. From a pricing perspective, the first TB is always free. Expect to pay US $999/year for 3TB.

 

Conclusion

Aparavi are looking to focus on the mid-market to begin with, and stressed to me that it isn’t really a tool that will replace your day to day business continuity tool. That said, they recognize that customers may end up using the tool in ways that they hadn’t anticipated.

Aparavi’s founding team of Adrian Knapp, Rod Christensen, Jonathan Calmes and Jay Hill have a whole lot of experience with data protection engines and a bunch of use cases. Speaking to Jonathan it feels like they’ve certainly thought about a lot the issues facing folks leveraging cloud for data protection. I like the open approach to storing the data, and the multi-cloud friendliness takes the story well beyond the hybrid slideware I’m accustomed to seeing from some companies.

Cloud has opened up a lot of possibilities for companies that were traditionally constrained by their own ability to deliver functional, scalable and efficient infrastructure internally. It’s since come to people’s attention that, much like the days of internal-only deployments, a whole lot of people who should know better still don’t understand what they’re doing with data protection, and there’s crap scattered everywhere. Products like Aparavi are a positive step towards taking control of data protection in fluid environments, potentially helping companies to get it together in an effective manner. I’m looking forward to diving further into the solution, and am interested to see how the industry reacts to Aparavi over the coming months.