Cohesity DataProtect Delivered As A Service – SaaS Connector

I recently wrote about my experience with Cohesity DataProtect Delivered as a Service. One thing I didn’t really go into in that article was the networking and resource requirements for the SaaS Connector deployment. It’s nothing earth-shattering, but I thought it was worthwhile noting nonetheless.

In terms of the VM that you deploy for each SaaS Connector, it has the following system requirements:

  • 4 CPUs
  • 10 GB RAM
  • 20 GB disk space (100 MB throughput, 100 IOPs)
  • Outbound Internet connection

In terms of scaleability, the advice from Cohesity at the time of writing is to deploy “one SaaS Connector for each 160 VMs or 16 TB of source data. If you have more data, we recommend that you stagger their first full backups”. Note that this is subject to change. The outbound Internet connectivity is important. You’ll (hopefully) have some kind of firewall in place, so the following ports need to be open.

Port
Protocol
Target
Direction (from Connector)
Purpose

443

TCP

helios.cohesity.com

Outgoing

Connection used for control path

443

TCP

helios-data.cohesity.com

Outgoing

Used to send telemetry data

22, 443

TCP

rt.cohesity.com

Outgoing

Support channel

11117

TCP

*.dmaas.helios.cohesity.com

Outgoing

Connection used for data path

29991

TCP

*.dmaas.helios.cohesity.com

Outgoing

Connection used for data path

443

TCP

*.cloudfront.net

Outgoing

To download upgrade packages

443

TCP

*.amazonaws.com

Outgoing

For S3 data traffic

123, 323

UDP

ntp.google.com or internal NTP

Outgoing

Clock sync

53

TCP & UDP

8.8.8.8 or internal DNS

Bidirectional

Host resolution

Cohesity recommends that you deploy more than one SaaS Connector, and you can scale them out depending on the number of VMs / how much data you’re protecting with the service.

If you’re having concerns with bandwidth, you can configure the bandwidth used by the SaaS Connector via Helios.

Navigate to Settings -> SaaS Connections and click on Bandwidth Usage Options. You can then add a rule.

You then schedule bandwidth usage, potentially for quiet times (particularly useful in small environments where Internet connections may be shared with end users). There’s support for upload and download traffic, and multiple schedules as well.

And that’s pretty much it. Once you have your SaaS Connectors deployed you can monitor everything from Helios.

 

Cohesity DataProtect Delivered As A Service – A Few Notes

As part of a recent vExpert giveaway the folks at Cohesity gave me a 30-day trial of the Cohesity DataProtect Delivered as a Service offering. This is a component of Cohesity’s Data Management as a Service (DMaaS) offering and, despite the slightly unwieldy name, it’s a pretty neat solution. I want to be clear that it’s been a little while since I had any real stick time with Cohesity’s DataProtect offering, and I’m looking at this in a friend’s home lab, so I’m making no comments or assertions regarding the performance of the service. I’d also like to be clear that I’m not making any recommendation one way or another with regards to the suitability of this service for your organisation. Every organisation has its own requirements and it’s up to you to determine whether this is the right thing for you.

 

Overview

I’ve added a longer article here that explains the setup process in more depth, but here’s the upshot of what you need to do to get up and running. In short, you sign up, select the region you want to backup workloads to, configure your SaaS Connectors for the particular workloads you’d like to protect, and then go nuts. It’s really pretty simple.

Workloads

In terms of supported workloads, the following environments are currently supported:

  • Hypervisors (VMware and Hyper-V);
  • NAS (generic SMB and NFS, Isilon, and NetApp);
  • Microsoft SQL Server;
  • Oracle;
  • Microsoft 365;
  • Amazon AWS; and
  • Physical hosts.

This list will obviously grow as some of the support for particular workloads with DataProtect and Helios improves over time.

Regions

The service is currently available in seven AWS Regions:

  • US East (Ohio)
  • US East (N. Virginia)
  • US West (Oregon)
  • US West (N. California)
  • Canada (Central)
  • Asia Pacific (Sydney)
  • Europe (Frankfurt)

You’ve got some flexibility in terms of where you store your data, but it’s my understanding that the telemetry data (i.e. Helios) goes to one of the US East Regions. It’s also important to note that once you’ve put data in a particular Region, you can’t then move that data to another Region.

Encryption

Data is encrypted in-flight and at rest, and you have a choice of KMS solutions (Cohesity-managed or DIY AWS KMS). Note that once you choose a KMS, you cannot change your mind. Well, you can, but you can’t do anything about it.

 

Thoughts

Data protection as a service offerings are proving increasingly popular with customers, data protection vendors, and service providers. The appeal for the punters is that they can apply some of the same thinking to protecting their investment in their cloud as they did to standing it up in the first place. The appeal for the vendors and SPs is that they can deliver service across a range of platforms without shipping tin anywhere, and build up annuity business as well.

With regards to this particular solution, it still has some rough edges, but it’s great to see just how much can already be achieved. As I mentioned, it’s been a while since I had some time with DataProtect, and some of the usability and functionality of both it and Helios has really come along in leaps and bounds. And the beauty of this being a vendor-delivered as a Service offering is that features can be rolled out on a frequent basis, rather than waiting for quarterly improvements to arrive via regularly scheduled software maintenance releases. Once you get your head around the workload, things tend to work as expected, and it was fairly simple to get everything setup and working in a short period of time.

This isn’t for everyone, obviously. If you’re not a fan of doing things in AWS, then you’re really not going to like how this works. And if you don’t operate near one of the currently supported Regions, then the tyranny of bandwidth (i.e. physics) may prevent reasonable recovery times from being achievable for you. It might seem a bit silly, but these are nonetheless things you need to consider when looking at adopting a service like this. It’s also important to think of the security posture of these kinds of services. Sure, things are encrypted, and you can use MFA with Helios, but folks outside the US sometimes don’t really dig the idea of any of their telemetry data living in the US. Sure, it’s a little bit tinfoil hat but it you’d be surprised how much it comes up. And it should be noted that this is the same for on-premises Cohesity solutions using Helios. Then again, Cohesity is by no means alone in sending telemetry data back for support and analysis purposes. It’s fairly common and something your infosec will likely already be across how to deal with it.

If you’re fine with that (and you probably should be), and looking to move away from protecting your data with on-premises solutions, or looking for something that gives you some flexible deployment and management options, this could be of interest. As I mentioned, the beauty of SaaS-based solutions is that they’re more frequently updated by the vendor with fixes and features. Plus you don’t need to do a lot of the heavy lifting in terms of care and feeding of the environment. You’ll also notice that this is the DataProtect component, and I imagine that Cohesity has plans to fill out the Data Management part of the solution more thoroughly in the future. If you’d like to try it for yourself, I believe there’s a trial you can sign up for. Finally, thanks to the Cohesity TAG folks for the vExpert giveaway and making this available to people like me.