What’s New With Zerto?

Zerto recently held their annual conference (ZertoCON) last week in Boston. I didn’t attend, but I did have time to catch up with Rob Strechay prior to Zerto making some announcements around the company and future direction. I thought I’d cover those here.

 

IT Resilience Platform

The first announcement revolved around the “IT Resilience Platform“. The idea behind the strategy is that backup, disaster recovery and cloud mobility solutions into a single, simple, scalable platform. Strechay says that “this strategy combines continuous availability, workload mobility, and multi-cloud agility to ensure you can withstand any disruption, leverage new technology seamlessly, and move forward with confidence”. They’ve found that Zerto is being used both for unplanned and planned disruptions, and they’ve also been seeing a lot more activity resolving ransomware and security incidents. From a planned outage perspective, DC consolidation has been a big part of the planned disruption activity as well.

What’s driving this direction? According to Strechay, companies are looking for fewer point solutions. They’re also seeing backup and DR activities converging. Cloud is driving this technology convergence and is changing the way data protection is being delivered.

  • Cloud for backup
  • Cloud for DR
  • Application mobility

“It’s good if it’s done properly”. Zerto tell me they haven’t rushed into this and are not taking the approach lightly. They see IT Resilience as a combination of  Backup, DR Replication, and Hybrid Cloud. Strechay told me that Zerto are going to stay software only and will partner on the hardware side where required. So what does it look like conceptually?

[image courtesy of Zerto]

Think of this as a mode of transport. The analytics and control is like the navigation system, the orchestration and automation layer are the steering wheel, and continuous data protection is the car.

 

Vision for the Future of Backup

Strechay also shared with me Zerto’s vision for the future of backup. In short, “it needs to change”. They really want to move away from the concept of periodic protection to continuous, journal-based protection delivering seconds of RPO at scale to meet customer expectations. How are they going to do this? The key differentiation will be CDP combined with best of breed replication.

 

Zerto 7 Preview

Strechay also shared some high level details of Zerto 7, with key features including:

  • Intelligent index and search
  • Elastic journal
  • Data protection workflows
  • Architecture enhanced
  • LTR targets

There’ll be a new and enhanced user experience – they’re busy revisiting workflows and enhancing a number of them (e.g. reducing clicks, enhanced APIs, etc). They’ll also be looking at features such as prescriptive analytics (what if I added more VMs to this journal?). They’re aiming for a release in Q1 2019.

 

Thoughts

The way we protect data is changing. Companies like Zerto, Rubrik and Cohesity are bringing a new way of thinking to an age old problem. They’re coming at it from slightly different angles as well. This can only be a good thing for the industry. A lot of the technical limitations that we faced previously have been removed in terms of bandwidth and processing power. This provides the opportunity to approach the problem from the business perspective. Rather than saying “we can’t do that”, we have the opportunity to say “we can do that”. That doesn’t mean that scale is a simple thing to manage, but it seems like there are more ways to solve this problem than there have been previously.

I’ve been a fan of Zerto’s approach for some time. I like the idea that a company has shared their new vision for data protection some months out from actually delivering the product. It makes a nice change from companies merely regurgitating highlights from their product release notes (not that that isn’t useful at times). Zerto have a rich history of delivering CDP solutions for virtualised environments, and they’ve made some great inroads with cloud workload protection as well. The idea of moving away from periodic data protection to something continuous is certainly interesting, and obviously fits in well with Zerto’s strengths. It’s possibly not a strategy that will work well in every situation, particularly with smaller environments. But if you’re leveraging replication technologies already, it’s worth looking at how Zerto might be able to deliver a more complete solution for your data protection requirements.