VMware Cloud on AWS – What’s New – February 2024

It’s been a little while since I posted an update on what’s new with VMware Cloud on AWS, so I thought I’d share some of the latest news.

 

M7i.metal-24xl Announced

It’s been a few months since it was announced at AWS re:Invent 2023, but the M7i.metal-24xl (one of the catchier host types I’ve seen) is going to the change the way we approach storage-heavy VMC on AWS deployments.

What is it?

It’s a host without local storage. There are 48 physical cores (96 logical cores with Hyper-Threading enabled). It has 384 GiB memory. The key point is that there are flexible NFS storage options to choose from – VMware Cloud Flex Storage or Amazon FSx for NetApp ONTAP. There’s support for up to 37.5 Gbps networking speed, and it supports always-on memory encryption using Intel Total Memory Encryption (TME).

Why?

Some of the potential use cases for this kind of host type are as follows:

  • CPU Intensive workloads
    • Image processing
    • Video encoding
    • Gaming servers
  • AI/ML Workloads
    • Code Generation
    • Natural Language Processing
    • Classical Machine Learning
    • Workloads with limited resource requirements
  • Web and application servers
    • Microservices/Management services
    • Secondary data stores/database applications
  • Ransomware & Disaster Recovery
    • Modern Ransomware Recovery
    • Next-gen DR
    • Compliance and Risk Management

Other Notes

New (greenfield) customers can deploy the M7i.metal-24xl in the first cluster using 2-16 nodes. Existing (brownfield) customers can deploy the M7i.metal-24xl in secondary clusters in the same SDDC. In terms of connectivity, we recommend you take advantage of VPC peering for your external storage connectivity. Note that there is no support for multi-AZ deployments, nor is there support for single node deployments. If you’d like to know more about the M7i.metal-24xl, there’s an excellent technical overview here.

 

vSAN Express Storage Architecture on VMware Cloud on AWS

SDDC Version 1.24 was announced in November 2023, and with that came support for vSAN Express Storage Architecture (ESA) on VMC on AWS. There’s some great info on what’s included in the 1.24 release here, but I thought I’d focus on some of the key constraints you need to look at when considering ESA in your VMC on AWS environment.

Currently, the following restrictions apply to vSAN ESA in VMware Cloud on AWS:
  • vSAN ESA is available for clusters using i4i hosts only.
  • vSAN ESA is not supported with stretched clusters.
  • vSAN ESA is not supported with 2-host clusters.
  • After you have deployed a cluster, you cannot convert from vSAN ESA to vSAN OSA or vice versa.
So why do it? There are plenty of reasons, including better performance, enhanced resource efficiency, and several improvements in terms of speed and resiliency. You can read more about it here.

VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery Updates

There have also been some significant changes to VCDR, with the recent announcement that we now support a 15-minute Recovery Point Objective (down from 30 minutes). There have also been a number of enhancements to the ransomware recovery capability, including automatic Linux security sensor installation in the recovery workflow (trust me, once you’ve done it manually a few times you’ll appreciate this). With all the talk of supplemental storage above, it should be noted that “VMware Cloud DR does not support recovering VMs to VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC with NFS-mounted external datastores including Amazon FSx for NetApp datastores, Cloud Control Volumes or VMware Cloud Flex Storage”. Just in case you had an idea that this might be something you want to do.

 

Thoughts

Much of the news about VMware has been around the acquisition by Broadcom. It certainly was news. In the meantime, however, the VMware Cloud on AWS product and engineering teams have continued to work on releasing innovative features and incremental improvements. The encouraging thing about this is that they are listening to customers and continuing to adapt the solution architecture to satisfy those requirements. This is a good thing for both existing and potential customers. If you looked at VMware Cloud on AWS three years ago and ruled it out, I think it’s worth looking at again.

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