VMware Cloud on AWS – TMCHAM – Part 13 – Delete the SDDC

Following on from my article on host removal, in this edition of Things My Customers Have Asked Me (TMCHAM), I’m going to cover SDDC removal on the VMware-managed VMware Cloud on AWS platform. Don’t worry, I haven’t lost my mind in a post-acquisition world. Rather, this is some of the info you’ll find useful if you’ve been running a trial or a proof of concept (as opposed to a pilot) deployment of VMware Cloud Disaster Recovery (VCDR) and / or VMware Cloud on AWS and want to clean some stuff up when you’re all done.

 

Process

Firstly, if you’re using VCDR and want to deactivate the deployment, the steps to perform are outlined here, and I’ve copied the main bits from that page below.

  1. Remove all DRaaS Connectors from all protected sites. See Remove a DRaaS Connector from a Protected Site.
  2. Delete all recovery SDDCs. See Delete a Recovery SDDC.
  3. Deactivate the recovery region from the Global DR Console. (Do this step last.) See Deactivate a Recovery Region. Usage charges for VMware Cloud DR are not stopped until this step is completed.

Funnily enough, as I was writing this, someone zapped our lab for reasons. So this is what a Region deactivation looks like in the VCDR UI.

Note that it’s important you perform these steps in that order, or you’ll have more cleanup work to do to get everything looking nice and tidy. I have witnessed firsthand someone doing it the other way and it’s not pretty. Note also that if your Recovery SDDC had services such as HCX connected, you should hold off deleting the Recovery SDDC until you’ve cleaned that bit up.

Secondly, if you have other workloads deployed in a VMware Cloud on AWS SDDC and want to remove a PoC SDDC, there are a few steps that you will need to follow.

If you’ve been using HCX to test migrations or network extension, you’ll need to follow these steps to remove it. Note that this should be initiated from the source side, and your HCX deployment should be in good order before you start (site pairings functioning, etc). You might also wish to remove a vCenter Cloud Gateway, and you can find information on that process here.

Finally, there are some AWS activities that you might want to undertake to clean everything up. These include:

  • Removing VIFs attached to your AWS VPC.
  • Deleting the VPC (this will likely be required if your organisation has a policy about how PoC deployments  are managed).
  • Tidy up and on-premises routing and firewall rules that may have been put in place for the PoC activity.

And that’s it. There’s not a lot to it, but tidying everything up after a PoC will ensure that you avoid any unexpected costs popping up in the future.

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