VMware Cloud on AWS – TMCHAM – Part 10 – Cluster Conversion

In this edition of Things My Customers Have Asked Me (TMCHAM), I’m going to delve into the topic of cluster conversions on the VMware-managed VMware Cloud on AWS platform.

 

Background

With the end of sale announcement of the I3.metal node type in VMware Cloud on AWS, I’ve had a few customers ask about how the cluster conversion process works. We’ve previously offered the ability to convert nodes from I3.metal to I3en.metal, and we’ve taken that process and made it possible for the I4i.metal node type as well. The process is outlined in some detail here. From a technical perspective, you’ll need to be on SDDC version 1.18v8 or 1.20v2 at a minimum. From a commercial perspective, to use your existing subscriptions, they’ll need to be flexible, or you can choose to add new subscriptions. Your account team can help with that.

 

Sounds Easy, What’s the Catch?

I’ve had a few customers run through this process now in my part of the world, and more and more folks are converting across to I4i.metal every week. One of the key considerations when planning the conversion, particularly with smaller environments, is sizing and storage policies. When the team converts your cluster, they will do some sizing estimates prior to the activity, and the results of this sizing might be higher than you’d expect. For example, we talk about the I4i.metal being something in the order of 1.6 – 2 times as powerful as the I3.metal node. But this really depends on a variety of factors, including the vSAN RAID policy in use, the types of workloads running on the cluster, and so forth. I’ve seen scenarios where a customer has wanted to convert a 6-node I3.metal cluster to 4 I4i.metal nodes. From a calculated capacity perspective, this should be a no-brainer. But what you’ll find, when working with the conversion team, is that they will likely come back to you saying that 6 nodes will be the target. The reason for this is that they’re assuming your cluster is running RAID 6.

How do you solve this problem? Think about the vSAN policy you want to run moving forward. If you’re happy to drop to RAID 5, for example, you have a way forward. Once the cluster conversion is complete, jump on and change the default policy to RAID 5 / FTT:1. This will cause vSAN to modify the policy for all of the VMs on the cluster. This is a background process, and won’t interfere with normal operations. Once you’ve done that, you can then remove the additional nodes. It’s a little fiddly, and will require some amount of coordination with the conversion team and your account team, but it’s a fairly simple task, and will get you running on new shiny boxes without having to muck about with setting up another cluster (or SDDC) and manually migrating workloads across.

You’ll want to ensure that changing your RAID policy won’t have an impact on your available storage. Every workload is different, but at a high level, you can use the public sizer to work through some of these numbers. A 16-node I3.metal cluster with RAID 6 configured will give you roughly 165.89 TiB of useable capacity (ignoring management workload overheads and vSAN slack space), and a similar storage footprint can be had with a 8 or 9-node cluster of I4i.metal nodes. You’ll also want to be sure your organisation is comfortable with the vSAN policy you’re moving to. If you’re moving from 16 nodes to 8 or 9 nodes, for example, this isn’t really a problem, as you’ll likely be sticking with RAID 6 for clusters that large. But if you’re going from 6 nodes to 3 nodes, you’re going from RAID 6 to RAID 1.

 

Thoughts and Further Reading

The neat thing about the VMware Cloud on AWS offering is that it’s a managed service from VMware, and we do a good job of managing boring stuff like this for you, reducing the impact of software and hardware changes by leveraging core VMware technologies that aren’t otherwise available on native cloud platforms. If you’d like to read more about the I4i.metal node – check out our FAQ here.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.