Scale Computing and Leostream – Better Than Bert And Ernie

Scale Computing recently announced some news about a VDI solution they delivered for Illinois-based Paris Community Hospital. I had the opportunity to speak with Alan Conboy about it and thought I’d share some coverage here.

 

VDI and HCI – A Pretty Famous Pairing

When I started to write this article, I was trying to think of a dynamic duo that I could compare VDI and HCI to. Batman and Robin? Bert and Ernie? MJ and Scottie? In any case, hyper-converged infrastructure and virtual desktop infrastructure has gone well together since the advent of HCI. It’s my opinion that HCI is in a number of enterprises by virtue of the fact that a VDI requirement arose. Once HCI is introduced into those enterprise environments, folks start to realise it’s useful for other stuff too.

Operational Savings

So it makes sense that Scale Computing’s HC3 solution would be used to deliver VDI solutions at some stage. And Leostream can provide the lifecycle manager / connection broker / gateway part of the story without breaking a sweat. According to Conboy Paris Community Hospital has managed to drastically reduce its operating costs, to the point that it’s reduced its resource investment to a part-time operations staff member to manage the environment. They’re apparently saving around $1 million (US) over the next five years, meaning they can now afford an extra doctor and additional nursing staff.

HCI – It’s All In The Box

If you’re familiar with HCI, you’ll know that most of the required infrastructure comes with the solution – compute, storage, and hypervisor. You also get the ability to do cool stuff in terms of snapshots and disaster recovery via replication.

 

Thoughts

VDI solutions have proven popular in healthcare environments for a number of reasons. They generally help the organisation control the applications that are run in the (usually) security-sensitive environment, particularly at the edge. It’s also useful in terms of endpoint maintenance, and removes the requirement to deploy high end client devices in clinical environments. It also provides a centralised mechanism to ensure that critical application updates are performed in a timely fashion.

You won’t necessarily save money deploying VDI on HCI in terms of software licensing or infrastructure investment. But you will potentially save money in terms of the operational resources required for endpoint and application support. If you can then spend those savings on medical staff, that has to be a win for the average healthcare organisation.

I’m the first to admit that I don’t get overly excited about VDI solutions. I can see the potential for value in some organisations, but I tend to lose focus rapidly when people start to talk to me about this stuff. That said, I do get enthusiastic about HCI solutions that make sense, and deliver value back to the business. It strikes me that this Scale Computing and Leostream combo has worked out pretty well for Paris Community Hospital. And that’s pretty cool. For more insight, Scale Computing has published a Customer Case Study that you can read here.

Atlantis – Not Your Father’s VDI

 

I’ve written about Atlantis Computing a few times before, and last week Bob Davis and Patrick Brennan were nice enough to run me through what they’ve been up to recently. What I’m about to cover isn’t breaking news, but I thought it worthwhile writing about nonetheless.

 

Citrix Workspace

Atlantis have been focusing an awful lot on Citrix workspaces lately, which I don’t think is a bad thing.

 

End-to-End Visibility

The beauty of a heavily integrated solution is that you get great insights all the way through the solution stack. Rather than having to look at multiple element managers to troubleshoot problems, you can get a view of everything from the one place. This is something I’ve had a number of customers asking for.

  • Single pane of glass for the entire virtual workspace infrastructure monitoring;
  • Proactive risk management for workspace;
  • Troubleshoot and identify workspace issues faster; and
  • Save money on operational costs.

 

Reporting

People love good reporting. So does Citrix, so you’ve got that in spades here as well.  Including:

  • Detailed historical information;
  • Proactive risk management;
  • Trending infrastructure requirements; and
  • Scaling with confidence.

 

On-demand Desktop Delivery

The whole solution can be integrated with the Citrix cloud offering, with:

  • Elastic dynamic provisioning on-premises or in the cloud with one management platform;
  • Rapid deployment of applications or desktops with simplified administration; and
  • Easy provision of Desktop as a Service.

 

HPE Intelligent Edge

It wouldn’t be product coverage without some kind of box shot. Software is nothing without hardware. Or so I like to say.

Here’s a link to the product landing page. It’s basically the HPE Edgeline EL4000 (4-Node) with m510 cartridges

  • M510 Cartridge: Intel Xeon D “Broadwell-DE” 1.7GHz – 16 cores w/ 128GB RAM
  • Equipped with NVMe
  • 4TB Effective Storage Capacity

It runs the full Citrix Stack: XenApp + XenDesktop + XenServer and was announced at Citrix Summit 2017.

 

Thoughts and Further Reading

I have a lot of clients using all kinds of different combinations to get apps and desktops to their clients. It can be a real pain to manage, and upgrades can be difficult to deliver in a seamless fashion. If you’re into Citrix, and I know a lot of people are, then the Atlantis approach using “full-stack management” certainly has its appeal.  It takes the concept of hyperconverged and adds a really useful layer of integration with application and desktop delivery, doing what HCI has done for infrastructure already and ratcheting it up a notch. Is this mega-hyperconverged? Maybe not, but it seems to be a smarter way to do things, albeit for a specific use case.

If there’s one thing that HCI hasn’t managed to do well, it’s translate the application layer into something as simple as the infrastructure that it’s hosted on. Arguably this is up to the people selling the apps, but it’s nice to see Atlantis having a crack at it.

Atlantis aren’t quite the household name that SimpliVity or Nutanix are (yes I know households don’t really talk about these companies either). But they’ve done some interesting stuff in the HCI space, and the decision to focus heavily on VDI has been a good one. There’s a lot to be said for solutions that are super simple to deploy and easy to maintain, particularly if the hosted software platform is also easy to use. Coupled with some solid cloud integration I think the solution is pretty neat, at least on paper. You can read about the announcement here. Here’s a link to the solution brief. If you’d like to find out more, head to this site and fill out the form. I’m looking forward to hearing about how this plays out in the data centre.