Rancher Labs Announces Longhorn General Availability

This happened a little while ago, and the news about Rancher Labs has shifted to Suse’s announcement regarding its intent to acquire Rancher Labs. Nonetheless, I had a chance to speak to Sheng Liang (Co-founder and CEO) about Longhorn’s general availability, and thought I’d share some thoughts here.

 

What Is It?

Described by Rancher Labs as “an enterprise-grade, cloud-native container storage solution”, Longhorn has been in development for around 6 years, in beta for a year, and is now generally available. It’s comprised of around 40k lines of Golang code, and each volume is a set of independent micro-services, orchestrated by Kubernetes.

Liang described this to me as “enterprise-grade distributed block storage for K8S”, and the features certainly seem to line up with those expectations. There’s support for:

  • Thin-provisioning, snapshots, backup, and restore
  • Non-disruptive volume expansion
  • Cross-cluster disaster recovery volume with defined RTO and RPO
  • Live upgrade of Longhorn software without impacting running volumes
  • Full-featured Kubernetes CLI integration and standalone UI

From a licensing perspective, Longhorn is free to download and use, and customers looking for support can purchase a premium support model with the same SLAs provided through Rancher Support Services. There are no licensing fees, and node-based subscription pricing keeps costs to a minimum.

Use Cases

Why would you use it?

  • Bare metal workloads
  • Edge persistent
  • Geo-replicated storage for Amazon EKS
  • Application backup and disaster recovery

 

Thoughts

One of the barriers to entry when moving from traditional infrastructure to cloud-native is that concepts seem slightly different to the comfortable slippers you may have been used to in enterprise infrastructure land. The neat thing about Longhorn is that it leverages a lot of the same concepts you’ll see in traditional storage deployments to deliver resilient and scalable persistent storage for Kubernetes.

This doesn’t mean that Rancher Labs is trying to compete with traditional storage vendors like Pure Storage and NetApp when it comes to delivering persistent storage for cloud workloads. Liang acknowledges that these shops can offer more storage features than Longhorn can. There seems to be nonetheless a requirement for this kind of accessible and robust solution. Plus it’s 100% open source.

Rancher Labs already has a good story to tell when it comes to making Kubernetes management a whole lot simpler. The addition of Longhorn simply improves that story further. If you’re feeling curious about Longhorn and would like to know more, this website has a lot of useful information.

Random Short Take #38

Welcome to Random Short Take #38. Not a huge amount of players have worn 38 in the NBA, and I’m not going to pretend I was ever a Kwame Brown fan. Although it did seem like he had a tough time of it. Anyway let’s get random.

  • Ransomware is the new hotness. Or, rather, protecting storage systems from ransomware is the new hotness. My man Chin-Fah had a writeup on that here. It’s not a matter of if, but rather when you’ll run into a problem. It’s been interesting to see the various approaches being taken by the storage vendors and the data protection companies.
  • Applications for the vExpert program intake for the second half of 2020 are open, but closing soon. It’s a fantastic program to be a part of, so if you think you’ve got the goods, you can apply here. I also recommend this article from Christopher on his experiences.
  • This was a great article from Alastair on some of the differences between networking with AWS and VMC on AWS. As someone who works for a VMware Cloud Provider, I can confirm that NSX (T or V, I don’t care) has a whole slew of capabilities and whole slew of integration challenges.
  • Are you Zoomed out? I am. Even when you think the problem can’t be the network, it might just be the network (I hope my friends in networking appreciate that it’s not always the storage). John Nicholson posted a typically comprehensive overview of how your bandwidth might be one of the things keeping you from demonstrating excellent radio voice on those seemingly endless meetings you’re doing at the moment. It could also be that you’re using crap audio devices too, but I think John’s going to cover that in the future.
  • Scale Computing has a good story to tell about what it’s been doing with a large school district in the U.S. Read more about that here.
  • This is one of those promotions aimed at my friends in Northern America more than folks based where I am, but I’m always happy to talk about deals on data protection. StorCentric has launched its “Retrospect Dads & Grads Promotion” offering a free 90-Day subscription license for every Retrospect Backup product. You can read more about that here.
  • Pure//Accelerate Online was this week, and Max did a nice write-up on Pure Storage File Services over at Gestalt IT.
  • Rancher Labs recently announced the general availability of Longhorn (a cloud-native container storage solution). I’m looking forward to digging in to this a bit more over the next little while.

 

 

Random Short Take #34

Welcome to Random Short Take #34. Some really good players have worn 34 in the NBA, including Ray Allen and Sir Charles. This one, though, goes out to my favourite enforcer, Charles Oakley. If it feels like it’s only been a week since the last post, that’s because it has.

  • I spoke to the folks at Rancher Labs a little while ago, and they’re doing some stuff around what they call “Edge Scalability” and have also announced Series D funding.
  • April Fool’s is always a bit of a trying time, what with a lot of the world being a few timezones removed from where I live. Invariably I stop checking news sites for a few days to be sure. Backblaze recognised that these are strange times, and decided to have some fun with their releases, rather than trying to fool people outright. I found the post on Catblaze Cloud Backup inspiring.
  • Hal Yaman announced the availability of version 2.6 of his Office 365 Backup sizing tool. Speaking of Veeam and handy utilities, the Veeam Extract utility is now available as a standalone tool. Cade talks about that here.
  • VMware vSphere 7 recently went GA. Here’s a handy article covering what it means for VMware cloud providers.
  • Speaking of VMware things, John Nicholson wrote a great article on SMB and vSAN (I can’t bring myself to write CIFS, even when I know why it’s being referred to that way).
  • Scale is infinite, until it isn’t. Azure had some minor issues recently, and Keith Townsend shared some thoughts on the situation.
  • StorMagic recently announced that it has acquired KeyNexus. It also announced the availability of SvKMS, a key management system for edge, DC, and cloud solutions.
  • Joey D’Antoni, in collaboration with DH2i, is delivering a webinar titled “Overcoming the HA/DR and Networking Challenges of SQL Server on Linux”. It’s being held on Wednesday 15th April at 11am Pacific Time. If that timezone works for you, you can find out more and register here.