EMC – naviseccli – checking your iSCSI ports are running at the correct speed

It’s been a while since I wrote about naviseccli and I admit I’ve missed it. I once wrote about using naviseccli to identify MirrorView ports on a CLARiiON array. Normally the MirrorView port is consistently located, but in that example we’d upgraded from a CX3-80 to a Cx4-960 and it was in a different spot. Oh how we laughed when we realised what the problem was. Anyway, we’ve been doing some work on an ever so slightly more modern VNX5300 and needed to confirm that some newly installed iSCSI SLICs were operating at the correct speed. (Note that these commands were run from the Control Station).

The first step is to list the ports

=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~= PuTTY log 2016.09.07 08:59:37 =~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=~=
[[email protected] ~]$ navicli -h A_VNXSP connection -getport

SP:  A
Port ID:  8
Port WWN:  iqn.1992-04.com.emc:cx.cetv2223700017.a8
iSCSI Alias:  0017.a8
IP Address:  192.168.0.13
Subnet Mask:  255.255.255.0
Gateway Address:  192.168.0.254
Initiator Authentication:  false

SP:  A
Port ID:  9
Port WWN:  iqn.1992-04.com.emc:cx.cetv2223700017.a9
iSCSI Alias:  0017.a9

SP:  A
Port ID:  10
Port WWN:  iqn.1992-04.com.emc:cx.cetv2223700017.a10
iSCSI Alias:  017.a10

SP:  A
Port ID:  11
Port WWN:  iqn.1992-04.com.emc:cx.cetv2223700017.a11
iSCSI Alias:  017.a11

SP:  B
Port ID:  8
Port WWN:  iqn.1992-04.com.emc:cx.cetv2223700017.b8
iSCSI Alias:  0017.b8
IP Address:  192.168.0.14
Subnet Mask:  255.255.255.0
Gateway Address:  192.168.0.254
Initiator Authentication:  false

SP:  B
Port ID:  9
Port WWN:  iqn.1992-04.com.emc:cx.cetv2223700017.b9
iSCSI Alias:  0017.b9

SP:  B
Port ID:  10
Port WWN:  iqn.1992-04.com.emc:cx.cetv2223700017.b10
iSCSI Alias:  017.b10

SP:  B
Port ID:  11
Port WWN:  iqn.1992-04.com.emc:cx.cetv2223700017.b11
iSCSI Alias:  017.b11

Once you’ve done that, you can list the port speed for a particular port

[[email protected] ~]$ navicli -h A_VNXSP connection -getport -sp a -portid 8 -speed
SP:  A
Port ID:  8
Port WWN:  iqn.1992-04.com.emc:cx.cetv2223700017.a8
iSCSI Alias:  0017.a8
IP Address:  192.168.0.13
Subnet Mask:  255.255.255.0
Gateway Address:  192.168.0.254
Initiator Authentication:  false
Port Speed:  1000 Mb
Auto-Negotiate:  Yes
Available Speeds:  10 Mb
-               :  100 Mb
-               :  1000 Mb
-               :  Auto

If you have a lot of ports to check this may not be the most efficient way to do it (ioportconfig may be more sensible), but if your network team are reporting on one particular port being an issue – this is a great way to narrow it down.

EMC – naviseccli – how to identify the MirrorView ports

With the introduction of Flexports the location of the MirrorView front-end port is not always the last port on the SP. Sometimes you’ll find it quicker to identify the MirrorView port through the use of naviseccli. Here’s how to do it.

If you don’t have the MirrorView enabler installed on the array, but want to keep the port aside for when you do, use the ioportconfig command to identify any ports marked as Special in Port Usage – these ones are MirrorView ports.

C:\>naviseccli -h 256.256.256.256 ioportconfig -list > c:\tmp\array_ports.txt

SP ID:   A
I/O Module Slot:   1
I/O Module Type:   Fibre Channel
I/O Module State:   Present
I/O Module Substate:   Good
I/O Module Power state:   On
I/O Carrier:   No

Information about each port on this I/O module: 
Physical Port ID:   0
Port Role:   BE
Logical Port ID:   2
Port Usage:   Normal
Port Type:   Fibre Channel
Port State:   Enabled
Port Substate:   Good
Is Persisted:   Yes

Physical Port ID:   1
Port Role:   BE
Logical Port ID:   3
Port Usage:   Normal
Port Type:   Fibre Channel
Port State:   Enabled
Port Substate:   Good
Is Persisted:   Yes

Physical Port ID:   2
Port Role:   FE
Logical Port ID:   2
Port Usage:   Normal
Port Type:   Fibre Channel
Port State:   Enabled
Port Substate:   Good
Is Persisted:   Yes

Physical Port ID:   3
Port Role:   FE
Logical Port ID:   3
Port Usage:   Special
Port Type:   Fibre Channel
Port State:   Enabled
Port Substate:   Good
Is Persisted:   Yes

If you have the MirrorView enabler installed the port command is all you need. This is a handy command with some pretty verbose output, and provides information on the total number of attached initiators, amongst other things.

C:\>naviseccli -h 256.256.256.256 port -list -sp -all > c:\tmp\array_port_list.txt

[snip]

SP Name:             SP B
SP Port ID:          3
SP UID:              50:06:01:60:BB:20:36:C1:50:06:01:6B:3B:20:36:C1
Link Status:         Up
Port Status:         Online
Switch Present:      YES
Switch UID:          20:09:00:0D:EC:5A:FA:81:20:CB:00:0D:EC:5A:FA:80
SP Source ID:        852207
ALPA Value:         0
Speed Value :         4Gbps
Auto Negotiable :     NO
Available Speeds:    
1Gbps
2Gbps
4Gbps
Auto
Requested Value:      Auto
MAC Address:         Not Applicable
SFP State:           Online
Reads:               0
Writes:              641452077
Blocks Read:         0
Blocks Written:      3126242880
Queue Full/Busy:     0
I/O Module Slot:     1
Physical Port ID:    3
Usage:     Mirrorview

Of course you can always look at the ports in Unisphere – check out an old post I did a little while ago for information on how to do that.