Nexsan Announces Unity NV6000

Nexsan recently announced the Nexsan Unity NV6000. I had the chance to speak to Andy Hill about it, and thought I’d share some thoughts here.

 

What Is It?

[image courtesy of Nexsan]

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again … in the immortal words of Silicon Valley: “It’s a box”. And a reasonably powerful one at that, coming loaded with the following specifications.

Supported Protocols SAN (Fibre Channel, iSCSI), NAS (NFS, SMB 1.0 to 3.0, FTP), Object (S3)
Disk Bays | Rack U 60 | 4U
Maximum Drives with Expansion 180
Maximum Raw Capacity (chassis | total) 1.12 PB Raw | 3.36 PB Raw
System Memory (DRAM) per controller up to 128GB
FASTier 2.5″ SSD Drives (TB) 1.92 | 3.84 | 7.68 | 15.36
3.5” 7.2K SAS Drives (TB) 4 | 6 | 8 | 10 | 12 | 14 | 16 | 18 | 20
2.5″ NVME 1DWPD SSDs (TB) N/A
Host Connectivity 16/32Gb FC | 10/25/40/100 GbE
Max CIFS | NFS File Systems 512
Data Protection: Immutable Snapshots, S3 Object-Locking, and optional Unbreakable Backup.

It’s a dual-controller platform, with each controller containing 2x Intel Xeon Silver CPUs and a 12Gb/s SAS backplane. Note that you get access to the following features included as part of the platform license:

  • Nexsan’s FASTier® Caching – Use solid-state to accelerate the performance of the underlying spinning disks
  • Nexsan Unity software version 7.0, with important enhancements to power, enterprise-class security, compliance, and ransomware protection
  • Enhanced Performance – Up to 100,000 IOPs
  • Third-Party Software Support – Windows VSS, VMware, VAAI, Commvault, Veeam Ready Repository, and more
  • Multi-Protocol Support – SAN (Fibre Channel, iSCSI), NAS (NFS, CIF, SMB1 to SMB3, FTP), Object (S3), 16/32GB FC, 10/25/40/100 GbE
  • High Availability – No single point-of-failure architecture with dual redundant storage controllers, redundant power supplies and RAID

 

Other Features

Snapshot Immutability

The snapshot immutability claim caught my eye, as immutable means a lot of things to a lot of people. Hill mentioned that the snapshot IP used on Unity was developed in-house by Nexsan and isn’t the patched together solution that some other vendors promote as an immutable solution. There are some other smarts within Unity that should give users comfort that data can’t be easily gotten at. Once you’ve set retention periods for snapshots, for example, you can’t log in to the platform and the set the date forward and have those snapshots expire. The object storage componet also supports S3 Object Lock, which is good news for punters looking to take advantage of this feature.

Unified Protocol Support

It’s in the name, and Nexsan has done a good job of incorporating a variety of storage protocols and physical access methods into the Unity platform. There’s File, Block, and Object, and support for both FC and speedy Ethernet as well. In other words, something for everyone.

Assureon Integration

One of the other features I like about the Unity is the integration with Assureon. If you’re unfamiliar with Assureon, you can check it out here. It takes storage security and compliance to another level, and is worth looking into if you have a requirement for things like regulatory compliant storage, the ability to maintain chain of custody, and fun things like that.

 

Thoughts and Further Reading

Who cares about storage arrays any more? A surprising number of people, and with good reason. Some folks still need them in the data centre. And folks are also looking for storage arrays that can do more with less. I think this is where the Nexsan offering excels, with multi-protocol and multi-transport support, along with some decent security chops and an all-inclusive licensing model, it provides for cost-effective storage (thanks to a mix of spinning rust and solid-state drives) that competes well with the solutions that have traditionally dominated the midrange market. Additionally, integration with solutions like Assureon makes this a solution that’s worth a second look, particularly if you’re in the market for object storage with a lower barrier to entry (from a cost and capacity perspective) and the ability to deal with backup data in a secure fashion.

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