Moving From CrashPlan Back To BackBlaze

The Problem

I recently received an email from the CrashPlan for Home Team and have included some of the text below:

“Thank you for being a CrashPlan® for Home customer. We’re honored that you’ve trusted us to protect your data.

It’s because of this trust that we want you to know that we have shifted our business strategy to focus on the enterprise and small business segments. This means that over the next 14 months we will be exiting the consumer market and you must choose another option for data backup before your subscription expires. We are committed to providing you with an easy and efficient transition.”

You may or may not recall (or care) that I moved from Mozy to BackBlaze when Mozy changed their pricing scheme. I then moved to CrashPlan when a local (to Australia) contact offered me an evaluation of their seed service. Since then I’ve been pretty happy with CrashPlan, and had setup some peer to peer stuff with Mat as well.

 

Now What?

CrashPlan are offering existing customers a very smooth transition to their business plans. While the price is a little higher than before, it’s still very reasonable. And there’s a big discount on offer for the first twelve months, and a bunch of other options available. Plus, I wouldn’t have to re-seed my data, and I can access local support and resources.

 

The Siren’s Call

There are a whole lot of differnet cloud backup solutions you can access. They’re listed in this handy table here. Some of them are sync-only services, and some of them are fully-fledged offerings. I’ve been a fan of BackBlaze’s offering and technical transparency for a long time, and noticed they were pretty quick to put up a post showing off their wares. Their pricing is very reasonable, I’ve never had too many problems with the software, and they offer USB restores of data if required. The issue is that I have about 1TB of data to seed and on an ADSL connection it’s going to take for ages. BackBlaze’s don’t offer the ability to seed data in a similar fashion to CrashPlan, so I’ll be sucking it up and trickling the data up to BackBlaze while maintaining my account with CrashPlan for Home. I’ll get back to you in a few years and let you know how that’s gone. In the meantime, the kind folks at BackBlaze did send me this link to their FAQ on moving from CrashPlan to BackBlaze which may be useful.

 

Feelings

A few people on the Internet were a bit cranky about the news of this mild pivot / change of strategic focus from CrashPlan. I think that’s testament to CrashPlan’s quality product and competitive pricing. They’re still giving users a lot of notice about what’s happening, and offering a very accessible migration path. The business plan is still very affordable, and offers a lot of useful functionality. As Mozy discovered a few years ago, consumers are notoriously cheap, and it’s sometimes hard to pay the bills when the market is demanding ridiculously low prices for what are actually pretty important services. I have no insight into CrashPlan’s financials, and won’t pretend to understand the drive behind this. I could choose to move my account to their business plan and not have to re-seed my data again, but I’ve always had a soft spot for BackBlaze, so I’ll be moving back to them.

If you’re not backing up your data (at least locally, and ideally to more than one destination) than you should start doing that. There’s nothing worse than trying to put back the pieces of your digital life from scraps of social media scattered across the Internet. If you’ve already got things in hand – good for you. Talk to your friends about the problem too. It’s a problem that can impact anyone, at any time, and it’s something that not enough people are talking about openly. BackBlaze haven’t paid me any money to write this post, I just thought it was something people might be interested in, given the experiences I’ve had with various vendors over time.

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