Komprise Continues To Gain Momentum

I first encountered Komprise at Storage Field Day 17, and was impressed by the offering. I recently had the opportunity to take a briefing with Krishna Subramanian, President and COO at Komprise, and thought I’d share some of my notes here.

 

Momentum

Funding

The primary reason for our call was to discuss Komprise’s Series C funding round of US $24 million. You can read the press release here. Some noteworthy achievements include:

  • Revenue more than doubled every single quarter, with existing customers steadily growing how much they manage with Komprise; and
  • Some customers now managing hundreds of PB with Komprise.

 

Key Verticals

Komprise are currently operating in the following key verticals:

  • Genomics and health care, with rapidly growing footprints;
  • Financial and Insurance sectors (5 out of 10 of the largest insurance companies in the world apparently use Komprise);
  • A lot of universities (research-heavy environments); and
  • Media and entertainment.

 

What’s It Do Again?

Komprise manages unstructured data over three key protocols (NFS, SMB, S3). You can read more about the product itself here, but some of the key features include the ability to “Transparently archive data”, as well as being able to put a copy of your data in another location (the cloud, for example).

 

So What’s New?

One of Komprise’s recent announcements was NAS to NAS migration.  Say, for example, you’d like to migrate your data from an Isilon environment to FlashBlade, all you have to do is set one as a source, and one as target. The ACLs are fully preserved across all scenarios, and Komprise does all the heavy lifting in the background.

They’re also working on what they call “Deep Analytics”. Komprise already aggregates file analytics data very efficiently. They’re now working on indexing metadata on files and exposing that index. This will give you “a Google-like search on all your data, no matter where it sits”. The idea is that you can find data using any combination of metadata. The feature is in beta right now, and part of the new funding is being used to expand and grow this capability.

 

Other Things?

Komprise can be driven entirely from an API, making it potentially interesting for service providers and VARs wanting to add support for unstructured data and associated offerings to their solutions. You can also use Komprise to “confine” data. The idea behind this is that data can be quarantined (if you’re not sure it’s being used by any applications). Using this feature you can perform staged deletions of data once you understand what applications are using what data (and when).

 

Thoughts

I don’t often write articles about companies getting additional funding. I’m always very happy when they do, as someone thinks they’re on the right track, and it means that people will continue to stay employed. I thought this was interesting enough news to cover though, given that unstructured data, and its growth and management challenges, is an area I’m interested in.

When I first wrote about Komprise I joked that I needed something like this for my garage. I think it’s still a valid assertion in a way. The enterprise, at least in the unstructured file space, is a mess based on the what I’ve seen in the wild. Users and administrators continue to struggle with the sheer volume and size of the data they have under their management. Tools such as this can provide valuable insights into what data is being used in your organisation, and, perhaps more importantly, who is using it. My favourite part is that you can actually do something with this knowledge, using Komprise to copy, migrate, or archive old (and new) data to other locations to potentially reduce the load on your primary storage.

I bang on all the time about the importance of archiving solutions in the enterprise, particularly when companies have petabytes of data under their purview. Yet, for reasons that I can’t fully comprehend, a number of enterprises continue to ignore the problem they have with data hoarding, instead opting to fill their DCs and cloud storage with old data that they don’t use (and very likely don’t need to store). Some of this is due to the fact that some of the traditional archive solution vendors have moved on to other focus areas. And some of it is likely due to the fact that archiving can be complicated if you can’t get the business to agree to stick to their own policies for document management. In just the same way as you can safely delete certain financial information after an amount of time has elapsed, so too can you do this with your corporate data. Or, at the very least, you can choose to store it on infrastructure that doesn’t cost a premium to maintain. I’m not saying “Go to work and delete old stuff”. But, you know, think about what you’re doing with all of that stuff. And if there’s no value in keeping the “kitchen cleaning roster May 2012.xls” file any more, think about deleting it? Or, consider a solution like Komprise to help you make some of those tough decisions.