EMC announces new VMAX range

VMAX3

 

 

Powerful, trusted, agile. That’s how EMC is positioning the refreshed range of VMAX arrays. Note that they used to be powerful, trusted and smart. Agile is the new smart. Or maybe agile isn’t smart? In any case, I’m thinking of it more as bigger, better, more. But I guess we’re getting to the same point. I sat in on a pre-announcement briefing recently and, while opinionalysis isn’t my strong point, I thought I’d cover off on some speeds and feeds and general highlights, and leave the rest to those who are good at that kind of thing. As always, if you want to know further about these announcements, the best place to start would be your local EMC account team.

There are three models: the 100K, 200K and 400K. The 100K supports

  • 1 – 2 engines;
  • 1440 2.5″ drives;
  • 2.4PB of storage; and
  • 64 ports.

The 200K supports

  • 1 – 4 engines;
  • 2880 2.5″ drives;
  • 4.8PB of storage; and
  • 128 ports.

Finally, the 400K supports

  • 1 – 8 engines;
  • 5760 2.5″ drives;
  • 9.6PB of storage; and
  • 256 ports.

*Note that the capacity figures and drive counts are based on code updates that are scheduled for release in 2015.

Hypermax Operating System is a significant enhancement to Enginuity, and is built to run not just data services inside the box, but services coming in from outside the box as well. This includes an embedded data storage hypervisor allowing you to run services that were traditionally run outside the frame, such as management consoles, file gateways, cloud gateways and data mobility services.

Dynamic Virtual Matrix is being introduced to leverage the higher number of cores in the new hardware models. In the largest 400K, there’ll be 384 CPU cores available to use. These can be dynamically allocated to front-end, back-end or data services. Core / CPU isolation is also an available capability.

While they look like an ultra-dense 10K, they’re not. You can have two engines and drives in a single cabinet. All models support all-flash configurations. If money’s no object, you could scale to 4PB of flash in one frame.

Virtual Matrix is now Infiniband, while the backend is now SAS.

EMC claims base support for 6 * 9s of availability, and 7 * 9s availability with VPLEX (that’s 5 seconds per year of downtime).

Snapshotting has been refreshed, with SnapVX supporting up to 1024 copies per source. Doesn’t impact I/O, and doesn’t require target configuration.

Finally, read up on EMC ProtectPoint, it’ll be worth your time.