Druva Is Useful, And Modern

Disclaimer: I recently attended VMworld 2017 – US.  My flights were paid for by ActualTech Media, VMware provided me with a free pass to the conference and various bits of swag, and Tech Field Day picked up my hotel costs. There is no requirement for me to blog about any of the content presented and I am not compensated in any way for my time at the event.  Some materials presented were discussed under NDA and don’t form part of my blog posts, but could influence future discussions.

You can view the video of Druva‘s presentation here, and you can download a PDF copy of my rough notes from here.

 

DMaaS

Druva have been around for a while, and I recently had the opportunity to hear from them at a Tech Field Day Extra event. They have combined their Phoenix and inSync products into a single platform, yielding Druva Cloud Platform. This is being positioned as a “Data Management-as-a-Service” offering.

 

Data Management-as-a-Service

Conceptually, it looks a little like this.

[image via Druva]

According to Druva, the solution takes into account all the good stuff, such as:

  • Protection;
  • Governance; and
  • Intelligence.

It works with both:

  • Local data sources (end points, branch offices, and DCs); and
  • Cloud data sources (such as IaaS, Cloud Applications, and PaaS).

The Druva cloud is powered by AWS, and provides, amongst other things:

  • Auto-tiering in the cloud (S3/S3IA/Glacier); and
  • Easy recovery to any location (servers or the cloud).

 

Just Because You Can Put A Cat …

With everything there’s a right way and a wrong way to do it. Sometimes you might do something and think that you’re doing it right, but you’re not. Wesley Snipes’s line in White Men Can’t Jump may not be appropriate for this post, but Druva came up with one that is: “A VCR in the cloud doesn’t give you Netflix”. When you’re looking at cloud-based data protection solutions, you need to think carefully about just what’s on offer. Druva have worked through a lot of these requirements and claim their solution:

  • Is fully managed (no need to deploy, manage, support software);
  • Offers predictable lower costs
  • Delivers linear and infinite (!) scalability
  • Provides automatic upgrades and patching; and
  • Offers seamless data services.

I’m a fan of the idea that cloud services can offer a somewhat predictable cost models to customers. One of the biggest concerns faced by the C-level folk I talk to is the variability of cost when it comes to consuming off-premises services. The platform also offers source side global deduplication, with:

  • Application-aware block-level deduplication;
  • Only unique blocks being sent; and
  • Forever incremental and efficient backups.

The advantage of this approach is that, as Druva charge based on “post-globally deduped storage consumed”, chances are you can keep your costs under control.

 

It Feels Proper Cloudy

I know a lot of people who are in the midst of the great cloud migration. A lot of them are only now (!) starting to think about how exactly they’re going to protect all of this data in the cloud. Some of them are taking their existing on-premises solutions and adapting them to deal with hybrid or public cloud workloads. Others are dabbling with various services that are primarily cloud-based. Worse still are the ones assuming that the SaaS provider is somehow magically taking care of their data protection needs. Architecting your apps for multiple geos is a step in the right direction towards availability, but you still need to think about data protection in terms of integrity, not just availability. The impression I got from Druva is that they’ve taken some of the best elements of their on-premises and cloud offerings, sprinkled some decent security in the mix, and come up with a solution that could prove remarkably effective.