Druva – In The Cloud, Of The Cloud, Protecting The Cloud

Disclaimer: I recently attended Tech Field Day 19.  My flights, accommodation and other expenses were paid for by Tech Field Day. There is no requirement for me to blog about any of the content presented and I am not compensated in any way for my time at the event.  Some materials presented were discussed under NDA and don’t form part of my blog posts, but could influence future discussions.

 

Druva recently presented at Tech Field Day 19. You can see videos of their presentation here, and download my rough notes from here. Here’s a photo of Jaspreet Singh kicking things off.

 

Let’s Talk About You

What do people want in a backup system?

I’ll tell you what we want. What we really, really want. Less Spice Girls ear worms. And a data protection service. It seems simplistic, but it’s true. A lot of organisations are tired of being IT organisations and they just want to consume services from companies that are IT organisations. That’s not a copout. They want to make money doing the things they’re good at. It’s one of the big reasons public cloud has proven so popular. Druva offers a service, and are positioning themselves as being to backups what Salesforce is to CRM. The key selling point is that they can do data protection simpler, faster, cheaper, and safer. And you get the two big benefits of SaaS:

  • There’s nothing to maintain; and
  • New features are made available immediately.

Am I The Ideal Druva Customer?

Are you a good fit though? If you’re running modern / virtualised workloads, Druva want to talk to you. To wit, if you find yourself in one of these categories you should be okay:

  • “Versatilist” Users;
  • Cloud focus or initiative;
  • Hybrid cloud environment;
  • Distributed workloads, including laptops;
  • SaaS adopter (SFDC, O365, G Suite); and
  • Moving away from legacy Unix and apps.

The more distributed your company is – the better Druva looks.

Who’s not a good fit for Druva though? Enterprises that:

  • Must have an on-premises backup system;
  • Have no desire to leverage cloud; and
  • Want a backup system for legacy OS / apps.

Poor enterprises, missing out again.

 

Challenges Solved by Druva

Curtis knows a bit about data protection, and he’s been around for a while now, so he remembers when not everything was peaches and cream in the data protection world. He talked about the various trends in data protection over the years and used the below table as an anchor point. The gist of it is that a solution such as the one Druva has doesn’t have quite as many challenges as the more “traditional” data protection systems we were using through for the last 20 plus years (yes, and longer still, I know).

! $ ? Challenges
$ ? Design, maintain, refresh physical backup server & storage
! $ ? Patch & upgrade backup server OS
! $ ? Patch & upgrade backup server software
! $ ? Manage multiple vendors (server, backup sw, tape, disk)
! Tape can be lost or stolen ???
$ ? Tape requires constant performance tweaking
$ Tape requires offsite vaulting vendor ???
$ Hardware typically bought in advance
$ ? Over-provision compute / storage (growth and variable load)
$ ? Not easy to scale
$ Unexpected / variable costs
$ Massive capital expenditures
! First large backup
! Any large restore

Every vendor can look good when you take tape out of consideration. It has an awful a lot of advantages in terms of capacity and economy, but the execution can often be a real pain. Druva also compete pretty well with the “hyper-converged” backup vendors, although I think they get a bad rap for having a focus on hardware that isn’t necessarily as much of a problem as some people think. The real killer feature for Druva is the cloud-native architecture, and the SaaS story in general.

 

Thoughts and Further Reading

It’s no secret that I’ve been a fan of Curtis for years, so when he moved to Druva I was intrigued and wanted to hear more. But Druva isn’t just Curtis. There are a whole bunch of people at the company who know cloud, and data protection, and have managed to put them together into a solution that makes a lot of sense. And I like what I’ve seen thus far. There’s a really good story here, particularly if you’re all in on cloud, and running relatively modern applications. The heritage in endpoint protection has helped them overcome some obstacles that other vendors haven’t had to deal with yet. They’re also willing to admit that not everything is perfect, particularly when it comes to getting that first large backup done. They also believe that “[w]ithin the limits of physics they can scale to meet the needs of most customers”. You’re not going to be able to achieve RPO 0 and RTO 0 with Druva. But that’s what things like replication are for. What they do offer, however, is an RTO of minutes, not hours. A few other things they don’t do include VM live mount and native support for Azure and GCP.

What Druva do do well is understand that customers have requirements that can be satisfied though the use of protection data. They also understand the real operational value (in terms of resiliency and reduced spend) that can be had with SaaS-based offerings. We all talk a tough game when it comes to buying what we think is the absolute best solution to protect our data, and rightly so. A business’s data is (hopefully) one of its most critical assets, and we should do anything we can to protect it. Druva are as dedicated as the next company to that philosophy, but they’ve also realised that the average business is under constant pressure to reduce costs wherever possible. Now you don’t just get to access the benefits of running your applications in the cloud – you can also get the benefit of protecting them in the cloud too.

Tape was hard to do well, and many of us have horror stories about things going wrong. Cloud can be hard to do well too, and there are plenty of stories of cloud going horribly wrong. Druva isn’t magic, but it does help take away a lot of the complexity that’s been frequently attached with protecting cloud-native workloads.

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