Druva Announces Cloud Platform Enhancements

Druva Cloud Platform

Data protection has been on my mind quite a bit lately. I’ve been talking to a number of vendors, partners and end users about data protection challenges and, sometimes, successes. With World Backup Day coming up I had the opportunity to get a briefing from W. Curtis Preston on Druva’s Cloud Platform and thought I’d share some of the details here.

 

What is it?

Druva Cloud Platform is Druva’s tool for tying together their as-a-Service data protection solution within a (sometimes maligned) single pane of glass. The idea behind it is you can protect your assets – from end points through to your cloud applications (and everything in between) – all from the one service, and all managed in the one place.

[image courtesy of Druva]

 

Druva Cloud Platform was discussed at Tech Field Day Extra at VMworld US 2017, and now fully supports Phoenix (the DC protection offering), inSync
(end point & SaaS protection), and Apollo (native EC2 backup). There’s also some nice Phoenix integration with VMware Cloud on AWS (VMC).

[image courtesy of Druva]

 

Druva’s Cloud Credentials

Druva provide a nice approach to as-a-Service data protection that’s a little different from a number of competing products:

  • You don’t need to see or manage backup server nodes;
  • Server infrastructure security is not your responsibility;
  • Server nodes are spawned / stopped based on load;
  • S3 is less expensive (and faster with parallelisation);
  • There are no egress charges during restore; and
  • No on-premises component or CapEx is required (although you can deploy a cache node for quicker restore to on-premises).

 

Thoughts

I first encountered Druva at Tech Field Day Extra VMworld US in 2017 and was impressed by both the breadth of their solution and the cloudiness of it all compared to some of the traditional vendor approaches to protecting cloud-native and traditional workloads via the cloud. They have great support for end point protection, SaaS and traditional, DC-flavoured workloads. I’m particularly a fan of their willingness to tackle end point protection. When I was first starting out in data protection, a lot of vendors were speaking about how they could protect business from data loss. Then it seemed like it all became a bit too hard and maybe we just started to assume that the data was safe somewhere in the cloud or data centre (week not really but we’re talking feelings, not fact for the moment). End point protection is not an easy thing to get right, but it’s a really important part of data protection. Because ultimately you’re protecting data from bad machines and bad events and, ultimately, bad people. Sometimes the people aren’t bad at all, just a little bit silly.

Cloud is hard to do well. Lifting and shifting workloads from the DC to the public cloud has proven to be a challenge for a lot of enterprises. And taking a lift and shift approach to data protection in the cloud is also proving to be a bit of challenge, not least of which because people struggle with the burstiness of cloud workloads and need protection solutions that can accommodate those requirements. I like Druva’s approach to data protection, at least from the point of view of their “cloud-nativeness” and their focus on protecting a broad spectrum of workloads and scenarios. Not everything they do will necessarily fit in with the way you do things in your business, but there’re some solid, modern foundations there to deliver a comprehensive service. And I think that’s a nice thing to build on.

Druva are also presenting at Cloud Field Day 3 in early April. I recommend checking out their session. Justin also did a post in anticipation of the session that is well worth a read.

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