Cohesity Basics – Cloud Tier

I’ve been doing some work with Cohesity in our lab and thought it worth covering some of the basic features that I think are pretty neat. In this edition of Cohesity Basics, I thought I’d quickly cover off how to get started with the “Cloud Tier” feature. You can read about Cohesity’s cloud integration approach here. El Reg did a nice write-up on the capability when it was first introduced as well.

 

What Is It?

Cohesity have a number of different technologies that integrate with the cloud, including Cloud Archive and Cloud Tier. With Cloud Archive you can send copies of snapshots up to the cloud to keep as a copy separate to the backup data you might have replicated to a secondary appliance. This is useful if you have some requirement to keep a monthly or six-monthly copy somewhere for compliance reasons. Cloud Tier is an overflow technology that allows you to have cold data migrated to a cloud target when the capacity of your environment exceeds 80%. Note that “coldness” is defined in this instance as older than 60 days. That is, you can’t just pump a lot of data in to your appliance to see how this works (trust me on that). The coldness level is configurable, but I recommend you engage with Cohesity support before you go down that track. It’s also important to note that once you turn on Cloud Tier for a View Box, you can’t turn it off again.

 

How Do I?

Here’s how to get started in 10 steps or less. Apologies if the quality of some of these screenshots is not great. The first thing to do is register an External Target on your appliance. In this example I’m running version 5.0.1 of the platform on a Cohesity Virtual Edition VM. Click on Protection – External Target.

Under External Targets you’ll see any External Targets you’ve already configured. Select Register External Target.

You’ll need to give it a name and choose whether you’re using it for Archival or Cloud Tier. This choice also impacts some of the types of available targets. You can’t, for example, configure a NAS or QStar target for use with Cloud Tier.

Selecting Cloud Tier will provide you with more cloudy targets, such as Google, AWS and Azure.

 

In this example, I’ve selected S3 (having already created the bucket I wanted to test with). You need to know the Bucket name, Region, Access Key ID and your Secret Access Key.

If you have it all correct, you can click on Register and it will work. If you’ve provided the wrong credentials, it won’t work. You then need to enable Cloud Tier on the View Box. Go to Platform – Cluster.

Click on View Boxes and the click on the three dots on the right to Edit the View Box configuration.

You then can toggle Cloud Tier and select the External Target you want to use for Cloud Tier.

Once everything is configured (and assuming you have some cold data to move to the cloud and your appliance is over 80% full) you can click on the cluster dashboard and you’ll see an overview of Cloud Tier storage in the Storage part of the overview.

 

 

Thoughts?

All the kids are getting into cloud nowadays, and Cohesity is no exception. I like this feature because it can help with managing capacity on your on-premises appliance, particularly if you’ve had a sudden influx of data into the environment, or you have a lot of old data that you likely won’t be accessing. You still need to think about your egress charges (if you need to get those cold blocks back) and you need to think about what the cost of that S3 bucket (or whatever you’re using) really is. I don’t see the default coldness level being a problem, as you’d hope that you sized your appliance well enough to cope with a certain amount of growth.

Features like this demonstrate both a willingness on behalf of Cohesity to embrace cloud technologies, as well as a focus on ease of use when it comes to reasonably complicated activities like moving protection data to an alternative location. My thinking is that you wouldn’t necessarily want to find yourself in the position of having to suddenly shunt a bunch of cold data to a cloud location if you can help it (although I haven’t done the maths on which is a better option) but it’s nice to know that the option is available and easy enough to setup.