Clumio’s DPaaS Is All SaaS

I recently had the chance to speak to Clumio’s Head of Product Marketing, Steve Siegel, about what they do, and thought I’d share a few notes here.

 

Clumio?

Clumio have raised $51M+ in Series A and B funding. They were founded in 2017, built on public cloud technology, and came out of stealth in August.

 

The Approach

Clumio want to be able to deliver a data management platform in the cloud. The first real opportunity they identified was Backup as a Service. The feeling was that there were too many backup models across private, public cloud, Software as a Service (SaaS), and none of them were particularly easy to take advantage of in an effective manner. This can be a real problem when you’re looking to protect critical information assets.

 

Proper SaaS

The answer, as far as Clumio were concerned, was to develop an “authentic SaaS” offering. This offering provides all of the features you’d expect from a SaaS-based DPaaS (yes, we’re now officially in acronym hell), including:

  • On-demand scalability
  • Ease of management
  • Predictable costs
  • Global compliance
  • Always-on security – with data encrypted in-flight and at-rest

The platform is mainly built on AWS at this stage, but there are plans in place to leverage the other hyperscalers in the future. Clumio charge per VM, with the subscription fee including support. They have plans to improve capabilities, with:

  • AWS support in Dec 2019
  • O365 support in Q1 2020

They currently support the following public cloud workloads:

  • VMware Cloud on AWS; and
  • AWS – extending backup and recovery to support EBC and EC2 workloads (RDS to follow soon after)

 

Thoughts and Further Reading

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you’ll notice that I’ve done a bit with data protection technologies over the years. From the big enterprise software shops to the “next-generation” data protection providers, as well as the consumer-side stuff and the “as a Service crowd”. There are a bunch of different ways to do data protection, and some work better than others. Clumio feel strongly that the “[s]implicity of SaaS is winning”, and there’s definitely an argument to be made that the simplicity of the approach is a big reason why the likes of Clumio will receive some significant attention from the marketplace.

That said, the success of services is ultimately determined by a few factors. In my opinion, a big part of what’s important when evaluating these types of services is whether they can technically service the requirements you have. If you’re an HP-UX shop running a bunch of on-premises tin, you might find that this type of service isn’t going to be much use. And if you’re using a cloud-based service but don’t really have decent connectivity to said cloud, you’re going to have a tough time getting your data back when something goes wrong. But that’s not all there is to it. You also need to look at how much it’s going to cost you to consume the service, and think about what it’s going to cost when something goes wrong. It’s all well and good if your daily ingress charges are relatively low with AWS, but if you need to get a bunch of data back out in a hurry, you might find it’s not a great experience, financially speaking. There are a bunch of factors that will impact this though, so you really need to do some modelling before you go down that path.

I’m a big fan of SaaS offerings when they’re done well, and I hope Clumio continue to innovate in the future and expand their support for workloads and infrastructure topologies. They’ve picked up a few customers, and are hiring smart people. You can read more about them over at Blocks & Files, and Ken Nalbone also covered them over at Gestalt IT.

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