Cloudtenna Announces DirectSearch GA

I’ve covered Cloudtenna in the past and had the good fortune to chat with Aaron Ganek about the general availability of Cloudtenna’s universal search product – DirectSearch. I thought I’d share some of my thoughts here.

 

About Cloudtenna

Cloudtenna are focussed on delivering “[t]urn-key search infrastructure designed specifically for files”. If you think of Elasticsearch as being synonymous with log search, then you might also like to think of Cloudtenna delivering an equivalent capability with file search.

The Challenge

According to Cloudtenna, the problem is that “[e]nterprises can’t keep track of files that are pattered across on-premises, cloud, and SaaS apps” and traditional search is a one-size-fits-all solution. In Cloudtenna’s opinion though, file search requires personalised search that reflects things such as ACLs. It’s expensive and difficult to scale.

Cloudtenna’s Solution

So what do Cloudtenna do then? The key features are the ability to:

  • Efficiently ingress massive amounts of data
  • Understand and adhere to user permissions
  • Return queries in near real-time
  • Reduce index storage and compute costs

“DirectSearch” is now generally available, and allows for cross-silo search across services such as DropBox, Gmail, Slack, Confluence, and so on. It seems reasonably priced at $10 US per user per month. Note that users who sign-up before December 1st 2018 can get 3 months of a free trial with no credit card details required).

DirectSearch CORE

In parallel to the release of DirectSearch, Cloudtenna are also announcing DirectSearch CORE – delivered via an OEM Model. I asked Ganek where he thought this kind of solution was a good fit. He told me that he saw it falling into three main categories:

  • Digital workspace category – eg. VMware, Citrix. Companies that want to be able to connect files into virtual digital workspaces;
  • Storage space – large storage vendors with SMB and NFS solutions – they might want to provide a global namespace over those transports; and
  • SaaS collaboration – eg. companies delivering chat, bug tracking, word processing – unify those offerings and give a single view of files.

Cloudtenna describe DirectSearch CORE as a turn-key file search infrastructure offering:

  • Fast query latency;
  • ACL crunching;
  • Deduplication; and
  • Contextual intelligence.

ACLs

One of the big challenges with delivering a solution like DirectSearch is that every data source has its own permissions and ACL enforcement is a big challenge. Keep in mind that all of these different applications have their own version of authentication mechanisms, with some using open directory standards, and others doing proprietary stuff. And once you have authentication sorted out, you still need to ensure that users only get access to what they’re allowed to see. Cloudtenna tackle this challenge by ingesting “native ACLs” and normalising those ACLs with metadata.

 

Thoughts

Search is hard to do well. You want it to be quick, accurate, and easy to use. You also generally want it to be able to find stuff in all kinds of places. One of the problems with modern infrastructure is that we have access to a whole bunch of content repositories as part of our everyday corporate endeavours. I work with Slack, Dropbox, Box, OneDrive, SharePoint, file servers, Microsoft Teams, iMessage, email, and all kinds of systems as part of my job. I’m the first to admit that I don’t always have a good handle on where some stuff is. And sometimes I use the wrong system because it’s more convenient to access than the correct one is. Now multiply this problem out by the thousands of users in a decent-sized enterprise and you’ve got a recipe for disaster in terms of finding corporate knowledge in a timely fashion. Combine that with billions of files and you’re a passenger on Terry Tate’s pain train. Cloudtenna has quite a job on its hands in terms of delivering on the promise of “[b]ringing order to file chaos”, but if they can do that, it’ll be pretty cool. I’ll be signing up for a trial in the very near future and, if chaotic files aren’t your bag, then maybe you should give it a spin too.

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