FalconStor Announces StorSafe

Remember FalconStor? You might have used its VTL product years ago? Or perhaps the Network Storage Server product? Anyway, it’s still around, and recently announced a new product. I had the opportunity to speak to Todd Brooks (CEO) and David Morris (VP Products) to discuss StorSafe, something FalconStor is positioning as “the industry’s first enterprise-class persistent data storage container”.

 

What Is It?

StorSafe is essentially a way to store data via containers. It has the following features:

  • Long-term archive storage capacity reduction drives low cost;
  • Multi-cloud archive storage;
  • Automatic archive integrity validation & journaling in the cloud;
  • Data egress fee optimisation; and
  • Unified Management and Analytics Console.

Persistent Virtual Storage Container

StorSafe is a bit different to the type of container you might expect from a company with VTL heritage.

  • Does not rely on traditional tape formats, e.g. LTO constraints
  • Variable Payload Capacity of Archival Optimisation by Type
  • Execution capabilities for Advanced Features
  • Encryption, Compression, and Best-in-Class Deduplication
  • Erasure coding for Redundancy across On-premise/Clouds
  • Portable – Transfer Container to Storage System or any S3 Cloud
  • Archival Retention for 10, 25, 50, & 100 years

[image courtesy of FalconStor]

Multi-Cloud Erasure Coding

  • The VSC is sharded into multiple Mini-Containers that are protected with Erasure Coding
  • These Mini-Containers can then be moved to multiple local, private data centres, or cloud destinations for archive
  • Tier Containers depending on Access Criticality or Limited Access needs

[image courtesy of FalconStor]

 

Thoughts And Further Reading

If you’re familiar with my announcement posts, you’ll know that I try to touch on the highlights provided to me by the vendor about its product, and add my own interpretation. I feel like I haven’t really done StorSafe justice however. It’s a cool idea, in a lot of ways. This idea that you can take a bunch of storage and dump it all over the place in a distributed fashion and have it be highly accessible and resilient. This isn’t designed for high performance storage requirements. This is very much focused on the kinds of data you’d be keen to store long-term, maybe on tape. I can’t tell you what this looks like from an implementation or performance perspective, so I can’t tell you whether the execution matches up with the idea that Falconstor has had. I find the promise of portability, particularly for data that you want to keep for a long time, extremely compelling. So let’s agree that this idea seems interesting, and watch this space for more on this as I learn more about it. You can read the press release here, and check out Mellor’s take on it here.