Cloudistics, Choice and Private Cloud

I’ve had my eye on Cloudistics for a little while now.  The published an interesting post recently on virtualisation and private cloud. It makes for an interesting read, and I thought I’d comment briefly and post this article if for no other reason than you can find your way to the post and check it out.

TL;DR – I’m rambling a bit, but it’s not about X versus Y, it’s more about getting your people and processes right.

 

Cloud, Schmoud

There are a bunch of different reasons why you’d want to adopt a cloud operating model, be it public, private or hybrid. These include the ability to take advantage of:

  • On-demand service;
  • Broad network access;
  • Resource pooling;
  • Rapid elasticity; and
  • Measured service, or pay-per-use.

Some of these aspects of cloud can be more useful to enterprises than others, depending in large part on where they are in their journey (I hate calling it that). The thing to keep in mind is that cloud is really just a way of doing things slightly differently to improve deficiencies in areas that are normally not tied to one particular piece of technology. What I mean by that is that cloud is a way of dealing with some of the issues that you’ve probably seen in your IT organisation. These include:

  • Poor planning;
  • Complicated network security models;
  • Lack of communication between IT and the business;
  • Applications that don’t scale; and
  • Lack of capacity planning.

Operating Expenditure

These are all difficult problems to solve, primarily because people running IT organisations need to be thinking not just about technology problems, but also people and business problems. And solving those problems takes resources, something that’s often in short supply. Coupled with the fact that many businesses feel like they’ve been handing out too much money to their IT organisations for years and you start to understand why many enterprises are struggling to adapt to new ways of doing things. One thing that public cloud does give you is a way to consume resources via OpEx rather than CapEx. The benefit here is that you’re only consuming what you need, and not paying for the whole thing to be built out on the off chance you’ll use it all over the five year life of the infrastructure. Private cloud can still provide this kind of benefit to the business via “showback” mechanisms that can really highlight the cost of infrastructure being consumed by internal business units. Everyone has complained at one time or another about the Finance group having 27 test environments, now they can let the executives know just what that actually costs.

Are You Really Cloud Native?

Another issue with moving to cloud is that a lot of enterprises are still looking to leverage Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) as an extension of on-premises capabilities rather than using cloud-native technologies. If you’ve gone with lift and shift (or “move and improve“) you’ve potentially just jammed a bunch of the same problems you had on-premises in someone else’s data centre. The good thing about moving to a cloud operating model (even if it’s private) is that you’ll get people (hopefully) used to consuming services from a catalogue, and taking responsibility for how much their footprint occupies. But if your idea of transformation is running SQL 2005 on Windows Server 2003 deployed from VMware vRA then I think you’ve got a bit of work to do.

 

Conclusion

As Cloudistics point out in their article, it isn’t really a conversation about virtualisation versus private cloud, as virtualisation (in my mind at least) is the platform that makes a lot of what we do nowadays with private cloud possible. What is more interesting is the private versus public debate. But even that one is no longer as clear cut as vendors would like you to believe. If a number of influential analysts are right, most of the world has started to realise that it’s all about a hybrid approach to cloud. The key benefits of adopting a new way of doing things are more about fixing up the boring stuff, like process. If you think you get your house in order simply by replacing the technology that underpins it then you’re in for a tough time.