Backblaze’s World Tour Of Europe

I spoke with Ahin Thomas at VMworld US last week about what Backblaze has been up to lately. The big news is that they’ve expanded data centre operations into Europe (Amsterdam specifically). Here’s a blog post from Backblaze talking about their new EU DC, and these three articles do a great job of explaining the process behind the DC selection.

So what does this mean exactly? If you’re not so keen on keeping your data in a US DC, you can create an account and start leveraging the EU region. There’s no facility to migrate existing data (at this stage), but if you have a lot of data you want to upload, you could use the B2 Fireball to get it in there.

 

Thoughts and Further Reading

When you think of Backblaze it’s likely that you think of their personal backup product, and the aforementioned hard drive stats and storage pod reference designs. So it might seem a little weird to see them giving briefings at a show like VMworld. But their B2 business is ramping up, and a lot of people involved in delivering VMware-based cloud services are looking at object storage as a way to do cost-effective storage at scale. There are also plenty of folks in the mid-market segment trying to find more cost effective ways to store older data and protect it without making huge investments in the traditional data protection offerings on the market.

It’s still early days in terms of some of the features on offer from Backblaze that can leverage multi-region capabilities, but the EU presence is a great first step in expanding their footprint and giving non-US customers the option to use resources that aren’t located on US soil. Sure, you’re still dealing with a US company, and you’re paying in US dollars, but at least you’ve got a little more choice in terms of where the data will be stored. I’ve been a Backblaze customer for my personal backups for some time, and I’m always happy to hear good news stories coming out of the company. I’m a big fan of the level of transparency they’ve historically shown, particularly when other vendors have chosen to present their solutions as magical black boxes. Sharing things like the storage pod design and hard drive statistics goes a long way to developing trust in Backblaze as the keeper of your stuff.

The business of using cloud storage for data protection and scalable file storage isn’t as simple as jamming a few rackmount boxes in a random DC, filling them with hard drives, charging $5 a month, and waiting for the money to roll in. There’s a lot more to it than that. You need to have a product that people want, you need to know how to deliver that product, and you need to be able to evolve as technology (and the market) evolves. I’m happy to see that Backblaze have moved into storage services with B2, and the move to the EU is another sign of that continuing evolution. I’m looking forward (with some amount of anticipation) to hearing what’s next with Backblaze.

If you’re thinking about taking up a subscription with Backblaze – you can use my link to sign up and I’ll get a free month and you will too.

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